all reviews
Michala Petri and Lars Hannibal
Café Vienna
19th Century Café Music
Review on Cafe Vienna in Music Web International
Music Web International
18 May 2009
The booklet has an interesting note about the history of Viennese coffee houses. The listener is invited to imagine being present on a leisurely Sunday afternoon in one of these houses sometime around 1800 and listening to these players as the "house band". I have no idea whether such a band might have comprised recorder and guitar - the sound and pitch of the recorder might tend to make conversation difficult in a small room, but for the non-scholar this is probably no matter when the result is as enjoyable as it is here. I note that none of the works on the disc were in fact written for this combination - most were for flute, violin or "csaken" (a folk instrument similar in size and range to a recorder) and guitar, but the arrangements are convincing and there is no feeling that the music has been given a inappropriate face-lift.

Only Beethoven and to a lesser extent Giuliani are familiar names as composers, and even then the former is represented by two of his least characteristic works, originally for mandolin and piano. They are charming miniatures which do sound better in their original and more tangy scoring but the arrangements are tasteful and do no great harm to the style and character of the music. The Giuliani is a bigger work in every way, in three movements ending with a Rondo Militaire. It is essentially a sunny piece full of Italianate melodies and charm. Most of the other pieces draw on other works to some extent. The Carulli for instance is based on "God save the Queen" and the Küffner includes variations on the Marseillaise. Both are entertaining and the latter is especially comical in the indignities it imposes on the tune.

Nothing on this disc is of any great musical consequence but everything is full of charm. For the most part the players simply present the music for what it is, without affectation or obvious showmanship but with considerable style, panache and, especially as far as the recorder is concerned, virtuosity. Taken in excess it might seem like an excessively sweet cup of coffee, but taken in judicious quantities it provides rare delight. The recording is clear and the booklet full and interesting - just the way to present unfamiliar material.

John Sheppard 

Music Web International

Michala Petri and Lars Hannibal
Café Vienna
19th Century Café Music
5 out of 5 stars for Café Vienna in BBC Music Magazine
BBC Music Magazine
05 May 2009
BBC Music Magazine

Performance 5 stars, recording 4 Stars


Michala Petri has done great things for the recorder, helping to bring it back centre-stage after its 19th-century eclipse by the flute and clarinet, and here she takes the process on further. However, "Café Vienna" is a misleading modish title for her collarboration with Lars Hannibal; what she have done is to bring a chamber-music genre out of the shadow, and also to extend-through new arrangements- the extremely narrow repertoire for their unusual instrumenttal combination, with Beethoven's unassuming little pieces in their collection being actually the least interesting. Far more noteworthy are the gravely spacious Fantasise sur un air national Anglais-" God save the King", that is by Ferdinando Carulli (1770-1841), the intricate Introduction, Theme and Variations by Ernest Krähmer (1795-1837), and the "Variations on an Austrian Folk tune" by Carl Scheindienst. Some of the works were written for violin and guitar or mandolin, and some for a rare Hungarian instrument called the csakan. . Michael Church March 2010
BBC Music Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Carolin Widmann, violin
Mozart Flute Quartets
Audiophile Audition Review on Mozart Flute Quartets
Audiophile Audition
02 May 2009
"A Winner – FIVE STARS!"

The four smiling women on the cover of this new edition of Mozart's flute quartets have much to be happy about. They've compiled a winner. For a start, search and discover these wondrous samples of their craft from K285 alone: in the Allegro, there's a graceful diminuendo at the conclusion of first theme's opening statement; at the conclusion of the Adagio two tantalizingly long rests; then there is the keen attention the ensemble gives to subtle shadings between repeats; and of course the pure hardwood tones of the recorders . . .what? Recorders?
That's right. Michala Petri plays these four sublime "flute" quartets on a variety of recorders: alto, soprano, even the birdlike sopranino. The first two may have originally been played on such instruments. However, this unorthodox programming choice works gloriously for all four pieces. She may dazzle us, but never do we get the impression that she's showing off her virtuosity (of which there is plenty). She is merely revealing this music in its best light. In fact, these quartets just happen to sound better than when played by most modern flute players.
The sonics of this SACD seem perfectly balanced, with tones warmer than a comforter in March. The three string players are extraordinary: their instruments complement the recorders the way balsamic vinegar does virgin olive oil. These performances are not only smooth, they are entertaining. The Tema
con variazioni of K285b recalls affective moments from Mozart's serenades: its poignant opening melody is seasoned with tasty triplets half way through. (Catch Petri's deft witty switch to sopranino at the conclusion.) There are many such high points on this CD. You will have to pick out the best for yourself, so listen close. This is music that may inspire you to curl up next to a fire, cat, or lover and forget the world's colossal disarray. – Peter Bates
*Michala Petri performs on the Mollenhauer Modern Alto recorder and the Moeck Rottenburgh Soprano and Sopranino recorders
Audiophile Audition

Michala Petri and Lars Hannibal
Café Vienna
19th Century Café Music
Great new review in American Record Guide on Café Vienna
American Record Guide
02 May 2009
Chamber Music (19th Century) - GIULIANI, M. / CARULLI, F. / KUFFNER, J. / BEETHOVEN, L. van / KRAHMER, E. (19th Century Cafe Music) (Petri, Hannibal)
6.220601
747313160167
Elaine Fine
American Record Guide, March/April 2010

Though Lars Hannibal spends much of his time arpeggiating on the tonic, subdominant, and dominant, he does it with tremendous finesse; and Petri, who can make the homeliest melody sound enchanting (and this recording has its share of homely melodies) floats, flies, and jumps into places I never knew the recorder could go.

The "menu" at this cafe includes music written for violin and guitar: Mauro Giuliani's Gran Duetto Concertante, Opus 52; Ferdinando Carulli's Fantasie sur un Air National Anglais (the ever-popular 'God Save the King'), and Joseph Küffner's Potpourri sur des Airs Nationaux Francais, which includes an amusing set of variations on 'La Marseillaise'.

I love the transcription and performance of two little-known pieces that Beethoven wrote for mandolin and fortepiano. The C-minor Sonatina, WoO 43a, is simple and lovely; and the C-major Sonatina, WoO 44a, might be the most light-hearted piece Beethoven ever wrote. These pieces sound completely natural on the soprano recorder and the guitar.

Ernest Krähmer wrote his Introduction, Theme and Variations for the csakan, an instrument that has the mouthpiece of a recorder, a very narrow bore, and five keys that eliminate or reduce the need for cross-fingerings. Perhaps the keys also make it possible to navigate the gymnastic writing in the high register. The instrument went out of fashion in the first part of the 20th Century, so Petri plays the csakan pieces on the recorder. I imagine that she switches instruments from alto to soprano for the sections of the pieces that go into the very high register. Joseph Mayseder's Potpourrie on Themes of Beethoven and Rossini was also written for the csakan and the guitar, as was Carl Scheindienst's Variations on Gestern Abend war Vetter Mikkel da, a pseudonymous work (Scheindienst translates as "imaginary servant") that was published in 1815.

I have been a devotee of Michala Petri since I first heard her play back in the 1970s. She is the wind-player's wind player. I have discussed her brilliant musicianship and impeccable technique with principal wind players in several major American orchestras, who hold her playing in the highest regard. I think what she does on the recorder is simply remarkable, and she continues to amaze me with her brilliant transcriptions. I hope that one day she will make them available to other recorder players, particularly since there is a dearth of original material for the soprano recorder.
American Record Guide

Michala Petri, recorder
Lan Shui, conductor
Chinese Recorder Concertos
East Meets West
Great BBC Music Magazine review on Chinese Recorder Concertos
BBC Music Magazine
26 February 2009
BBC Music Magazine  4 out of 5 stars
This is not the first Chinese collaboration by the Danish recorder virtuoso Michala Petri, but it's the most interesting yet. Inspired by their country's rich variety of flute traditions, these four concertos reflect the way China's composers are melding their musical heritage with the symphonic one of Western Europe and America. And they also reflect the thoroughness with which Chinese composers have transcended the privations of those terrible years when they were condemned to hard labour in the countryside.
Tang Jianping's Fei Ge draws on the folk music of the Hmong, but has at times a confident, almost Broadway lushness of sound; Sheng's Flute Moon calls on all Petri's virtuosity, plus that of the Danish orchestra's piccolo player; Ma Shui-Long's Bamboo Flute Concerto is initially relentlessly cheerful, before moving into a graceful echo of 20th-century English pastoralism. The three movements of Chen Yi's The Ancient Chinese Beauty – the most original of those works – use Petri's three recorders to reflect the respective timbres and tone-colours of three very different Chinese flutes. Each of these works has its own charm, each will help to build China's still-evolving indigenous symphonic tradition. Michael Church, December 2010
BBC Music Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Danish National Symphony Orchestra
Movements
American Record Guide Review on Movements
American Record Guide
25 February 2009
A complete analysis of American orchestral programming is, as we say in academic writing,"beyond the scope of this essay" but I want to posit a general theory here: these stellar works will probably not be heard on stage in the USA anytime soon. True, some orchestras are at least a little adventurous in programming these days and deserve at least a modicum of credit for trying new things. But it is a safe bet that most music directors and arts administrators, when faced with a choice between a brilliant new concerto played on a less popular instrument (e.g. recorder) and an old familiar soloist or repertoire selection will make the predictable, safe choice. That is too bad. I would maybe even purchase a subscription if I thought that my ears, brain, and heart would be chalIenged at least once in a while.

Michala Petri is clearly an excellent musician, and the Danish National Symphony is a highly disciplined, competent ensemble. If you like challenging new music that is not academic, but still brilliantIy conceived, find this. If you do not hear this played by your local orchestra in the next decade, write a letter or stop going. Better yet, spend some time in Denmark,where it seems you can love great music and have a brain at the same time!
American Record Guide

Michala Petri, recorder
Carolin Widmann, violin
Mozart Flute Quartets
New US review in Fanfare Magazine on Mozart
Fanfare Magazine
20 December 2008
"…this is a remarkable and enchanting disc of exceptional attributes!"
Can anyone believe that Michala Petri is now 50 years old? Time is certainly beginning to pass me by more rapidly than I'd like to admit, but I was taken aback when reminded that she made her debut all the way back in 1969, and the career ever since has certainly approached legendary status.
Her playing doesn't seem to have suffered much either, judging by this new SACD of stunning Mozartian revelry and extraordinarily rich surround sound. But why the recorder? I supposed one could be flippant and answer, "Because she is Michala Petri and wants to do it." But even as the notes to this deluxe release admit, the recorder was well on its way out the door when these quartets were written, and the transverse flute had already replaced the instrument as the primary home wind instrument, fairly easy to play and featuring a more luxurious and subtle sound than the more piecing recorder. But, using the model that Mozart himself was a practical man and would have approved playing the pieces on recorder if there were a Thaler involved, we now have this very interesting and well-played (if not really definitive, only because of instrumentation) release.
It is not probable that these works were written either for commission or for initial publication, but for Mozart's friends and colleagues. But the question remains as to the choice of solo instrument here. I must say that Petri does her dead level best not to remind us that this is a recorder by playing with a softer sound and using a variety of instruments. Nonetheless, for those who know the works well it will come as a slight shock to hear them played this way, though by the end you will have long forgotten about it and been completely swayed by the stunning musicianship and excellent rapport among these sterling colleagues... —this is a remarkable and enchanting disc of exceptional attributes. Steven E. Ritter
Fanfare Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Carolin Widmann, violin
Mozart Flute Quartets
All Music Guide, America
All Music Guide
17 November 2008
Review by Uncle Dave Lewis 
Recorder virtuoso Michala Petri is a big proponent of performing certain early transverse flute literature on her chosen instrument, and in a way, she has a point — when it comes to Mozart's flute chamber music, the recorder is closer to the wooden flute favored in Mozart's day than a modern flute, with its many keys and metal body. The question is to whether one might develop a preference for the recorder over a modern flute in these often recorded, generally familiar works; not a likely scenario for most flute fanciers. The answer is once you hear Petri play them on recorder, you might not go back to the flute. Our Recordings' Mozart: Flute Quartets is that good — Petri's tone seems effortless and is pristine and pure, but never whistle-like, and Petri's legato on the recorder is seamless and smooth. Accentuating such positives is the ad hoc chamber group supporting Petri on this disc, undeniably beauteous young ladies from Germany, Lithuania and Latvia respectively, violinist Carolin Widmann, violist Ula Ulijona and cellist Marta Sudraba. They are responsive to both Petri and to Mozart's subtle shades of dynamics in this music, which is excellently well recorded onto the SACD format. The sessions were held at a studio on the Danish island of Bornholm during the summertime, and the recording is of such quality as to bring the tincture of warm, northern sea air into the room through one's speakers. Our Recordings' Mozart: Flute Quartets is recommended, and should appeal to those who enjoy exceptionally well-recorded, attractive and life-affirming chamber music; chances are, once the listener is into this disc for a while, they will soon forget that they are listening to a recorder rather than a flute.
All Music Guide

Michala Petri, recorder
Lars Hannibal, guitar
Siesta
Recorder and Guitar
A 10/10/10 for Siesta in Klassik Heute
Klassik Heute Magazine
16 October 2008
Details (19.09.2008)
Bestellen

 

Nach drei Jahrzehnten Präsenz und über 70 Veröffentlichungen auf dem internationalen Plattenmarkt entschloss sich die Blockflötistin Michala Petri zusammen mit ihrem Mann, dem Gitarristen Lars Hannibal, eigene Wege zu gehen. Sie gründeten ein eigenes Label mit dem sinnigen Namen OUR Recordings.

Siesta ist der Titel einer der ersten Produktionen der gemeinsamen Firma und präsentiert einen Ausschnitt aus dem Duo-Repertoire für Blockflöte und Gitarre, das beide Künstler seit Beginn ihrer Zusammenarbeit 1992 einem breiten Publikum in aller Welt vorgestellt haben. Rein äußerlich schon wirkt die CD mit ihren angenehmen erdfarbenen Tönen entspannend, und der Inhalt löst das optische Versprechen ein: Bewährte Klassiker wie Astor Piazzollas Histoire du Tango, Iberts Entr'acte oder Ravels Pièce en forme de Habanera sind der Garant für das unwiderstehliche Flair südlicher Sonne. Drei Stücke aus Brasilien von Heitor Villa–Lobos, die bekannte Sonatine Castelnuovo-Tedescos und der eigens für das Duo komponierte Tango català von Joan Albert Amargós ergänzen das Programm. Es ist erstaunlich, welche Vielfalt an Klangnuancen Michala Petri ihrer Blockflöte entlockt, die man bisher wohl nur einer Querflöte zutraute: warm im Ton, selbst in der Höhe wendig, nutzt sie den Vorteil verschiedener Instrumente der Blockflötenfamilie und stellt so manches altvertraute Stück in ein neues Licht. Michalas Zusammenarbeit mit dem spanischen Jazz-Pianisten und Komponisten Joan Albert Amargós trug bereits reiche Früchte: neben dem hier eingespielten Tango catalá, einem leicht melancholischen Amalgam aus südamerikanischem Tango und andalusischem Flamenco, schrieb Amargós ein großartiges Blockflötenkonzert für Michala Petri, das auf der CD Movements ebenso bei OUR Recordings erhältlich ist und 2008 – als erste Blockflötenaufnahme überhaupt – für einen Grammy nominiert wurde. Ganz wunderbar gelingen beiden Künstlern auch Iberts spritziger Entr'acte und die herrlich atmosphärisch-evozierenden Stücke Villa Lobos'.

Michala Petri und Lars Hannibal ist genau das geglückt, was man sich zum Programm der Aufnahme gemacht hatte: eine CD zum Zurücklehnen und Genießen.

Heinz Braun (19.09.2008)
Künstlerische Qualität:
  10
Bewertungsskala: 1-10
Klangqualität:
  10

Gesamteindruck:
  10
 

Klassik Heute Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Carolin Widmann, violin
Mozart Flute Quartets
A 10/10 in Classic Today on Mozart
Classical Today Magazine
16 October 2008
Classic Today.

You could easily make the case that the recorder--not the modern orchestral flute--should be the preferred instrument for Mozart's so-called "flute quartets". At least, you could after hearing Michala Petri's lovely, fluid, timbrally congenial, eminently entertaining--and yes, virtuoso performances. The virtuoso description must be applied here because the facility of technique, the miraculous control of breath and phrasing, the affecting attention to even the smallest nuance of articulation (all embodied in the opening minutes of K. 285) are in a league by themselves among today's recorder soloists.


As such, Petri's playing--accompanied by a very capable string trio with the rapport and ensemble awareness of seasoned chamber musicians (listen to the delicate phrasing in the Menuetto of K. 285a)--allows her lines their "solo" character while achieving a more gratifying integration with the strings than is possible with the modern flute's more assertive, metallic voice. The warm, ebony-timbre of the three different recorders Petri uses (alto, soprano, and sopranino) actually has a closer affinity to the quality of the stringed instruments, and thus to the flute of Mozart's day. Although even in the hands of a master like Petri the recorder's intonation challenges can't be absolutely solved, the few slightly under-pitch moments are just that--momentary--and will be unnoticed by all but the most keen-eared, attentive listeners.


Petri's impressive technical command of these instruments--supported by gorgeous, natural, ideally balanced sonics--allows her complete musical/expressive freedom, and in pieces that are not among Mozart's most notably sophisticated creations, she and her responsive partners make music that's both eloquent and entertaining--just what Mozart would have wanted. Highly recommended!


--David Vernier

To read this review online, click here.
Classical Today Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Carolin Widmann, violin
Mozart Flute Quartets
10 in Klassik Heute on Mozart
Klassik Heute Magazine
16 October 2008
OUR Recordings 6.220570
Werke von W.A. Mozart

Michala Petri • Carolin Widmann • Ula Ulijona • Marta Sudraba

1 CD • 59 Min. • 2007

Details (26.09.2008)
Bestellen

 

Mozart auf der Blockflöte? Sicher werden einige Aufführungspraxis-Fundamentalisten und Skeptiker schon die Idee allein verwerflich finden. Trotz alledem – Michala Petris Konzept einer Neuaufnahme der Flötenquartette Mozarts auf der Blockflöte ist aufgegangen. Ihre Argumente sind durchaus stichhaltig. Zum einen liegt der weiche, runde Klang einer Blockflöte dem der (hölzernen) Traversflöte, für die Mozart seine Quartette ja konzipiert hatte, näher als der silbrig brillante Ton einer modernen Querflöte; zum anderen darf man wohl getrost der Fragestellung nach der Legitimität einer Realisierung der Quartette des Booklet-Autors Claus Johansen folgen, der Mozart (selbstredend hypothetisch) antworten lässt: „Wie hoch ist das Honorar"?

Mich jedenfalls überzeugt Michala Petris Einspielung. Mehr noch, durch den ungewohnten Klang der Blockflöte hört man die Quartette gleichsam wie aus einer neuen Perspektive. Die spieltechnischen Entwicklungen der letzten Jahre und instrumentenspezifischen Neuerungen der Blockflöte sind an Michala Petri nicht spurlos vorübergegangen. Im Vergleich zu früher ist Petris Spiel klanglich flexibler geworden und hat an dynamischer Bandbreite und Expressivität gewonnen. Mit den drei Streicherinnen gelingt ihr ein perfektes, organisches Zusammenspiel. Kritikpunkte seien nicht verschwiegen: An einigen Stellen scheint mir die Blockflöte intonatorisch etwas zu hoch, und das Thema des A-Dur-Quartetts (dem Petri mit einer Sopranblockflöte Frische und Brillanz verleiht) wirkt – im Gegensatz zum Rest der Aufnahme – etwas undifferenziert und plan in Bezug auf Phrasierung und Artikulation. Trotz dieser kleinen Einschränkung eine überzeugende, absolut gültige Aufnahme, die so manchen Mozart-Freund positiv überraschen wird.

Heinz Braun (26.09.2008)
Künstlerische Qualität:
  9
Bewertungsskala: 1-10
Klangqualität:
  10

Gesamteindruck:
  9
 

Klassik Heute Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Danish National Symphony Orchestra
Movements
10/10/10 for Movements
Markus Zahnhausen
16 October 2008
Klassik Heute

That the flute in the last quarter of the twentieth century has been kept in the major concert halls of the world, is in large part thanks to the Danish recorder player Michala Petri. Sometimes eyed enviously, it is always her way away from an old music scene. Her unprecedented international success has its rights. Once a virtuoso miracle child, Michala Petri is now more grownup than ever before - this CD proves it - a mature artist personality. Consistently supported by major record companies, and together with her husband and Duo partner Lars Hannibal, she has founded her own CD label, to be even more devoted to the repertoire which is close to her heart.

A number of years ago, the CD "Moon Child's Dream" presented some contemporary concertante works for the instrument. "Movements" finally brings three new recorder concerts, especially composed for Michala Petri. All three are exquisitely composed and could hardly be more different.

The Catalan Joan Albert Amargós is one of the most important living composers in Spain. His 2005 Northern Concerto betrays the sovereign master of timbre and the orchestra set. Amargós' music embraces its origin, a mixture of Mediterranean color and fiery rhythms, which quite surely conceals their color and immediacy into the concert repertoire's likely tracks. Noticeably, the effect of Amargós' music is not based on superficial variety, but on the masterly control and amalgamation of form, color and content.

No less convincing is the 2002-written Pipes and Bells from Swedish composer Daniel Börtz. He also belongs to the prominent figures of music life. It is already his second konzertantes works for flute and orchestra (to A Joker's Tales, composed in 1999/2000 for Dan Laurin). Also, Börtz dominated the orchestra masterfully: cleverly combining the recorder at the beginning with the mysterious dark timbre of a bass clarinet. Börtz developed his material as effectively as exciting: powerful, percussive passages, with bright accents of the orchestra of an almost angelic light.

The 2000 Etudes written by the American composer Steven Stucky features dodgy rhythms, scales rapid movements, glissandos and ostinatos deploying atmospheric sound of no less of an effective and unique art.

Michala's artistic personality and her outstanding skills are instrumental to the enrichment of the recorder repertoire with these three major works. A phenomenal recording, wonderful music!

Artistic quality:
10
Sound quality:
10
Overall impression:
10
Markus Zahnhausen (25.05.2007)
Markus Zahnhausen

Michala Petri, recorder
Carolin Widmann, violin
Mozart Flute Quartets
Interview with Hannibal in the leading German Magazine for Chambermusic,- Ensemble
Ensemble
29 September 2008
Carsten Dürer

Lars Hannibal ist ein Name, der vor allem unter den Gitarrenkennern einen Ruf besitzt. Doch dieser dänische Künstler hat sich niemals um Normen gekümmert, hat schon frühzeitig entschieden, dass die dialogisierende Form des kammermusikalischen Miteinanders spannender ist, als solistisch Karriere zu machen. Und natürlich lässt sich solch ein Künstler auch gerne von anderen beeinflussen. Seit einigen Jahren ist Hannibal fasziniert von der Verbindung von traditioneller und zeitgenössischer chinesischer Musik mit der traditionellen europäischen Kunstmusik. Dieses Interesse hat bereits Früchte getragen, die nicht nur in Konzerten, sondern auch auf einigen CDs, die Hannibal auf seinem eigenen Label veröffentlicht, zu hören sind. Wir besuchten Lars Hannibal in seinem nördlich von Kopenhagen gelegenen Haus, um mit ihm zu sprechen.

Wenn man Lars Hannibal festlegen will, widerspricht er vorsichtig und doch eindeutig. Mit der Aussage konfrontiert, dass er wohl mehr ein Kammermusiker sei als ein in klassischem Denken zu sehender Gitarrist, sagt er: „In erster Linie bin ich ein Musiker, der Gitarre und Laute spielt. Manchmal fühle ich mich als Gitarrist, aber nicht mit einem großen G, und manches Mal als Lautenist, aber nicht mit dem großen L.  Ich spiele beide Instrumente, so dass ich immer einen Kompromiss finden musste, technisch und in Bezug auf die Musik. Ich mag die Musik der Renaissance; aber auch des Barock und späterer Zeiten. Warum sollte ich also eine bestimmte Musik ausschließlich wählen? Ich würde mich niemals limitieren, die Musik nur mit bestimmten Leuten spielen, die sich spezialisiert haben auf eine bestimmte Musikrichtung." Lars Hannibal ist ein extremer Freidenker, wenn es um die Musik geht, wenn es darum geht, sich und seine Ideen mit der Musik auszudrücken.

Und dabei spielt die konzertante Duoform eine ganz
entscheidende Rolle: „Für mich ist die Duoform die interessanteste und intensivste Form des Musizierens. Wie wir hier sitzen und uns in die Augen schauen können, uns auf ein Gegenüber konzentrieren, so ist es auch in der Musik. Wenn es auch nur ein dritter Mitspieler ist, dann sind wir schon abgelenkt, da wir auch Kontakt zu einer dritten Person halten müssen." Dieses Prinzip erkennt er in den Lautenliedern aus der elisabethanischen Periode wie von Dowland, ebenso wie in den heutigen Projekten mit einem Geiger oder der Blockflötistin Michala Petri.


Entwicklung zum Freidenker

Es gab im Leben von Lars Hannibal einen Punkt, an dem er sich entschied, kein Solo-Gitarrist zu werden. Er besuchte einen Meisterkurs von Konrad Ragossnig, der ihn dazu bringen wollte, sich unter seiner Führung auf eine Solo-Karriere vorzubereiten. Ein interessantes Angebot. Aber Hannibal erklärt: „Ja, ich besuchte einen Meisterkurs in Ahus, wo er zwei Mal war. Ich spielte ein Werk vor, für das ich brannte: ‚The Diary of Che Guevara'. Als er dies hörte, sagte er, dass diese Art der Kommunikation mit dem Publikum über das Gitarrenspiel ungewöhnlich sei. So lud er mich nach Basel in seine Klasse ein.  Aber zu dieser Zeit war mein Leben schon so interessant, spielte ich mit unterschiedlichen Musikern zusammen, arbeitete mit Sängern. Dennoch war es ein verführerisches Angebot, das Ragossnig mir machte. Aber ich stellte fest, dass es mehr meiner Natur entspricht, weiterzumachen mit den Dingen, die ich begonnen hatte." Zudem war Hannibal bewusst, dass es eine harte Herausforderung sein würde, solistisch zu bestehen, auch wenn es eine Zeit (70er und 80er Jahre) war, in der die Gitarre noch eine weitaus wichtigere Rolle im Musikleben spielte, als es heute der Fall ist. Warum hart? Nun, er begann recht spät das Spiel auf der klassischen Gitarre, hatte seine ersten Erfahrungen mit der Rock- und später dann auch der Jazzgitarre gemacht, bevor er die klassische Gitarre als sein Instrument wählte. Er hätte extremen Nachholbedarf in Bezug auf die Arbeit gehabt, die ihn als Solist erwartet hätte. „Ich entschied, dass das soziale Leben, auch die vielen Diskussionen im Zusammenspiel mit anderen Musikern eher meinem Naturell entsprechen würden." Dennoch ließ Ragossnig nicht locker, besuchte ihn noch zwei Mal, doch die Entscheidung war gefallen. „Ich denke heute, dass die Entscheidung absolut richtig war, denn ich bin nicht die richtige Person, die ein einsames Leben als Solist führen könnte. Ich habe diese Erfahrung gemacht und fühlte mich so einsam auf der Bühne, und auch nach den Konzerten im Hotel. Das habe ich einige Monate lang erlebt und war mir schnell sicher, dass ich dies niemals mehr machen möchte. Ich will mit anderen Musikern auf der Bühne sitzen, mich inspirieren lassen, meine Begeisterung nach den Konzerten mit Musikern teilen."

Offenheit und eigenes Label

Wenn man auf das Leben von Lars Hannibal zurückschaut, dann hat man den Eindruck, dass er auch aufgrund seiner Erfahrungen mit Musikrichtungen wie Rock und Jazz immer schon offen für andere Stilrichtungen war als ausschließlich das klassische Gitarrenrepertoire. Ist dieser Eindruck richtig? „Ja, es gab sehr viele Musiker, gerade hier in Dänemark, aber auch in Deutschland, die mit Popmusik, mit den Beatles und Donavan begannen und dann einen intensiven Zugang zur Gitarre als Instrument bekamen, begannen Blues zu spielen, oder andere Stilrichtungen. Und diese Quereinsteiger sind viel offener für die Verbindung von anderen Arten von Musik, spielen heute auch viel eher zeitgenössische Musik, haben kleinere Ensembles gegründet, oder sind in die organisatorische Richtung gegangen, haben kleine Musikreihen oder auch Festivals gegründet. Das liegt natürlich an diesem Hintergrund."
Nachdem Lars Hannibal viele Jahre für große Schallplattenfirmen wie RCA/BMG und EMI aufnahm, kam ein Bruch, das war im Jahre 2006: Er gründete sein eigenes Label unter dem Namen „Our Recordings". Warum gab er die Zusammenarbeit mit den namhaften Labels auf, um sich den schwierigen Marktbedingungen eines kleinen Labels zu stellen? „Das hat sich natürlich über viele Jahre entwickelt, die Entscheidung war nur ein Zusammenkommen vieler Überlegungen. Ich habe die Entwicklungen und die Veränderungen auf dem CD-Markt für viele Jahre verfolgt, und dann kam die Entscheidung: Wenn man ein eigenes Label haben will, dann sollte man es jetzt gründen." Diese Überlegungen, die vorausgingen, klärten die Entscheidung – wie auch bei vielen anderen

Das Interesse an China

Fast zur selben Zeit, als die beiden Musiker ihr eigenes Label gründeten, kam bei Lars Hannibal auch das Interesse an der Musik Chinas auf. Warum ausgerechnet China? „Das ist eine Geschichte, die auch eine Entwicklung hat. Wir haben mehrfach in Japan gespielt und auch einige Projekte mit japanischen Musikern gespielt, also gemeinsam mit traditionellen japanischen Instrumenten. Und ich dachte damals schon, dass es sicherlich spannend wäre, diese östlichen instrumente einmal mit den westlichen Ideen zu verbinden. Eines Tages erhielt ich einen Anruf der chinesischen Botschaft in Kopenhagen, das ist nun vier Jahre her. Man fragte, ob wir gerne zum Tee mit dem chinesischen Botschafter kommen wollten. Ich dachte zuerst, dass dies ein Witz, ein Märchen sei. Aber als wir da waren, erklärte er uns, dass er schon einige musikalische Projekte verwirklicht hatte, als er Botschafter in Griechenland war. Dann fragte er mich, ob ich mir vorstellen könnte, nach China zu gehen, um dort mit chinesischen Musikern zusammenzuarbeiten. Ich war sofort bereit." So organisierte man für Lars Hannibal und Michala Petri einige Auftritte beim „Shanghai Festival of Arts", das war 2004. Da begann alles. Lars Hannibal war begeistert von den traditionellen Instrumentalisten und ihren Fähigkeiten. „Es waren Virtuosen, diese chinesischen Musiker, auch wenn sie europäische Musik spielten. Aber die traditionellen Instrumente und die traditionelle Musik faszinierten mich sofort." Doch als er zurück war und mit einigen Musikern in Europa sprach, hörte er immer wieder, dass das ja alles schön und gut sei, dass diese Musik auch interessant wäre, aber dass die chinesischen Musiker keine Seele hätten, um die europäische Musik zu verstehen. „Das war für mich eine Provokation, da ich einen vollkommen anderen Eindruck erhalten hatte. Ich war bewegt von der Musik, ich fühlte, dass diese Musiker ihr Herzblut in die Musik legten."
In den vergangenen Jahren hat sich Lars Hannibal intensiv mit der Musik und ihrer Tradition in China auseinandergesetzt. „Ich glaube, dass in China die Tradition für die nationale Musik recht unterbrochen war. Auch wenn es in der Zeit von Maos Kulturrevolution Klassen für traditionelle Musik am Konservatorium in Peking gab, waren diese zu dieser Zeit doch stark zensiert und kontrolliert. So gab es Musik, die nicht gespielt werden durfte, und selbst Instrumente, die verboten waren." Aber er fand auch in kleineren Städten immer wieder Musiker, die die Traditionen der Musik und des Instrumentariums bewahrt haben, da sie nicht im Fokus der Machtausübenden standen. „Diese Musik ist so vielfältig, wenn wir an die Mongolei denken, oder an andere Teile des heutigen Chinas. Es gibt so unterschiedliche Traditionen, deren wir uns noch gar nicht recht Musikern. „Wenn man für ein großes Label aufnimmt, dann ist die Unterstützung gut, solange man gute Verkäufe erzielt. Wenn man einen guten Artist & Repertoire Director (wie die Leute sich nennen, die für die direkte Zusammenarbeit mit den Künstlern bei Schallplattenfirmen zuständig sind) hat, der genau weiß, was ein Künstler kann und wohin er will, dann funktioniert die Zusammenarbeit gut. Aber es gibt heutzutage nur noch wenige, die das leisten können. Viele haben eigene Labels gegründet oder sahen ein, dass man in diesem Geschäft nicht vorankommen kann. Michala Petri und ich hatten das Gefühl, dass wir nicht darüber diskutieren wollten, was wir für gut empfinden und was nicht, nur weil es sich besser oder schlechter verkauft. Es war einfach eine künstlerische Entscheidung." Die beiden Musiker gründeten also ein eigenes Label. „Wir wollten unsere Freiheit haben und nicht unterbrochen werden von Leuten, die nicht verstehen, was man machen will. Ich verstehe, dass die Firmen Geld verdienen müssen, aber das war nicht unser Fokus. Man gründet kein eigenes Label, um Geld damit zu verdienen", grinst er vielsagend. Nach einem Konzert: Lars Hannibal mit Yana Theng Bin.

bewusst sind. Man kann nicht einmal sagen, diese Musik sei chinesisch, sondern es ist Musik der Regionen." Die pentatonische Musiklinie ist die sicherlich wichtigste Gemeinsamkeit dieser Musikausübungen.

Dialog-Kammermusik

Wenn man heutzutage nach China kommt, bemerkt man schnell, dass es dort keine Tradition für Kammermusik gibt, zumindest nicht für Kammermusik im traditionell europäischen Denken. Wie also versucht Hannibal die Chinesen in diese Richtung zu bringen, sich für diese Musikausübungsart zu begeistern? Er widerspricht: „Es gibt eine Tradition der Kammermusik in China, die klassische traditionelle Kammermusik mit der Pipa, der Guqin und anderen Saiteninstrumenten. Diese Musik wurde immer schon in kleinen Räumen gespielt, in der Verbotenen Stadt." Also war es eine Art von höfischer Musik. „Ja genau, das war Hofmusik. Diese Tradition gibt es. Wir müssen also diese Musik nur mit unserer und unserem Denken von Kammermusik verbinden." Ist das konzertante Moment, so wie wir es aus unserer Kammermusik kennen, auch dort vorhanden? „Absolut ja. Und wir nennen unsere Projekte auch ‚Dialoge – East meets West'. Und das ist der Oberbegriff, unter dem alles stattfindet. Es gibt viele verschiedene Projekte, das erste war Guqin mit der Gitarre zu verbinden als eine Art von Continuo-Gruppe, und die Blockflöte über diesen Instrumenten als Soloinstrument – um es wie eine barocke Gruppe erklingen zu lassen. Dann habe ich einige Experimente mit einem Guqin- und einem Xiao-Spieler gemeinsam mit der Gitarre durchgeführt und wir haben unterschiedlichste Werke gespielt, von Tan Dun und anderen." Momentan allerdings will er weiter gehen, will wieder in der Duoform zurückgehen, die er so gut kennt. „Später werde ich dann vielleicht wieder zu mehr Instrumenten zurückkehren, wenn ich mehr darüber weiß, wie man phrasieren soll."
Das grundlegende Interesse an dieser Kombination, das hört man schnell heraus, ist der Klang an sich, das Experimentieren mit den Klängen aus unterschiedlichen Kulturbereichen. „Der Klang und die Instrumente sind der eigentliche Fokus. Natürlich gibt es für diese Besetzungen keine geschriebene Literatur, also muss man vorhandene arrangieren. Aber ich arrangiere nun schon mein ganzes Leben, das bin ich gewohnt. Oder man spielt zeitgenössische Werke, die speziell für diese Besetzungen geschrieben wurden." Allerdings hat er auch mit der bearbeiteten, niedergeschriebenen Musik Erfahrungen gemacht, die so verschieden sind von den europäischen Sichtweisen: „Chinesische Musiker haben ein vollkommen anderes Gefühl für Rhythmus und für Phrasierung, für das Zeitgefühl an sich. Ich versuchte strikt zu spielen, da ich es so gewohnt war, sie aber geben sich mehr Zeit, nehmen sie sich einfach. Das liegt auch daran, dass sie auf ihren Instrumenten in der Regel weniger Töne zur Verfügung haben, vor allem die pentatonische Reihe. Der Weg von einem zum nächsten Ton ist also sehr wichtig und den gehen sie auf unterschiedlichste Arten." Die Musik chinesischen Ursprungs ist freier zu spielen, als westliche Musiker es gewohnt sind, hat auch immer ein Moment des Improvisatorischen in sich. „Der Moment, in dem man diese Musik spielt, ist dabei extrem wichtig", erklärt Lars Hannibal noch.

Die Akzeptanz

Wie sieht die Akzeptanz dieser Musikverbindung aus? Ist sie in unterschiedlichen Ländern unterschiedlich ausgefallen? „In China habe ich festgestellt, dass die Offenheit für diese Verbindung von Ost und West weit größer ist als hier in Europa. In Europa gibt es einige zeitgenössische chinesische Komponisten, denen wir offen gegenüberstehen, da wir denken, sie sind es wert. Aber die Chinesen denken auch, ihre eigene Musik in anderer Art gespielt zu hören. Wenn man also die europäische Musik mit chinesischen Instrumenten in China spielt, denken die meisten: Oh, das ist eine nette Melodie. Sie denken in Melodien, nicht an die Komplexität in der Musik, nicht intellektuell." Hat das etwas mit dem in dieser Richtung ausgebildeten Intellekt zu tun, oder aber damit, dass die Menschen in Europa selbstgefällig denken, sie wären das Herzstück für Kammermusik in aller Welt? „So ist es, absolut richtig. Sie denken: Wir wissen es besser. Wir sind aufgewachsen mit der Idee, zu wissen, wie es zu sein hat, denn es gab immer Richter, die sagten, wie es sein muss, wie wir Musik hören sollen. In China gibt es diese Tradition nicht. Sie denken nur: Mag ich es, oder mag ich es nicht?"
Diese Erfahrung kann man natürlich erst seit der Konterrevolution im nachmaoistischen China machen. Nun sind die Menschen hungrig nach allem, was neu ist, und was man während der Regierung unter Mao nicht erfahren konnte. „Das ist richtig, aber man darf auch dabei nicht vergessen, dass die Chinesen ihr Land lieben, dass die meisten Chinesen China als Zentrum der Welt ansehen. Das war schon immer so. Wenn man also die chinesische Musik mit der europäischen verbindet, dann sind immer noch chinesische Elemente erkennbar, an denen sie sich orientieren können. Dann aber sind sie offen für diese Art. Dann glauben sie andersherum: Da kommt nicht jemand, der uns erzählt, wie es sein muss, sondern der ebenso offen mit unserer Tradition umgeht. Also geben wir ihm eine Chance. Das ist eine chinesische Eigenschaft."
Wie aber kann man nun den Europäern diese Art der Kombination näherbringen? „Das ist schwer", gibt Hannibal zu, „aber man sieht jetzt schon die sich immer stärker anbahnende Offenheit. In New York gibt es schon ganze Serien für chinesische Musiker, die mit europäischen zusammen spielen. Es ist eine Bewegung, die mehr und mehr kommt. Auch die Veranstalter werden dafür offener, wenn das Publikum beginnt, sich dieser Musik zu öffnen. Und es gibt so eine große Vielfalt und Schönheit in dieser Musik, wie man es sich kaum vorstellen kann. Aber wir kennen das nicht, es war für uns vollkommen verschlossen." Lars Hannibal ist enthusiastisch über diese Art der neuen verbindenden Kammermusik. Und er sieht, dass es nicht nur eine Einbahnstraße sein kann, dass man wieder einmal die Kammermusik Europas exportiert, sondern man auch offen für die andere Seite sein muss. „Und dafür müssen wir diese Verbindung schaffen, eine neue Musiksprache, eine Verquickung der beiden Sprachen", erklärt er seine Ideen. „Diese neue Sprache muss aber die Herzen erreichen, wir müssen dabei den Verstand ausschalten können, dann funktioniert es auch." Bislang hat man vor allem in wirtschaftlicher Hinsicht nach China geschaut, und dies fast ausschließlich. Hier und da hat man auch schon die darstellenden Künste der vergangenen 50 Jahre und der Frühzeit Chinas rezipiert. Aber die Musik ist dabei nicht beachtet worden. Will man aber die Menschen in China verstehen, will man beginnen mit ihnen zu leben, sie zu akzeptieren, dann ist diese Art der Musik-Verständigung extrem wichtig, da es um emotionale Dinge geht, die uns die chinesische Mentalität leichter näherbringen können. Vor allem, wenn man auch chinesische Firmen nach Europa holen möchte, sollte man darüber nachdenken, sich der chinesischen Musik mehr zu öffnen, denn dann werden sich die Mitarbeiter auch in Europa leichter zurechtfinden.
Das eigene Label hilft dabei, mit Chinesen zu arbeiten, denn man kann immer sagen, dass die Möglichkeit besteht, dass diese Musik auch auf einer
CD eingespielt wird. Also denkt man doch etwas geschäftlich und nicht nur künstlerisch, wenn man ein eigenes Label gründet? „Ja, das muss man auch.
Manches Mal ist es etwas schwer, diese Dinge zu trennen."
Ensemble

Michala Petri, recorder
Kremerata Baltica
Michala Petri's 50th Birthday Concert
Review on 50 years Birthday Concert in Danish Newspaper Jyllandsposten
Jyllandsposten
21 September 2008
Petris fødselsdag
Blokfløjtens Michala Petri fejrede i juli 2008 sin 50 års fødselsdag med en koncert i Tivoli. Gidon Kremers fremragende kammerorkester Kremerata Baltica, som Petri har samarbejdet med før, deltog.
Live-optagelsen af ønskeprogrammet byder på et broget program, som indledes traditionelt med en fin d-mol koncert af Tomasso Albinoni, som senere følges op med en Vivaldi-koncert i G-dur.
Der er også en livlig Mozartandante En del af den "nye" Michala Petri er samarbejdet med den kinesiske komponist Chen Yi, som på en ret fængslende måde har kombineret en ren kinesisk tradition med vesteuropæisk koncertmusik.
Spændende er også Artem Vassilievs blokfløjtekoncert "Valre lubere"(At sige farvel), mens en 1900-tals koncert for strygere af Nino Rota er mindre interessant.
Afslutningen er festlig og vittig med Peter Heidrichs "Happy Birthday"-variationer ( Our Recordings 8.226905, distribution: Naxos ).

Jyllandsposten

Michala Petri, recorder
Lars Hannibal, guitar
Siesta
Recorder and Guitar
New US review on Siesta in Fanfare Magazine
Fanfare Magazine
19 September 2008
When I read the word "Siesta," I picture a recumbent Mexican wearing a multicolored serape snoozing under his extravagantly brimmed sombrero. For Lars Hannibal, however, a siesta offers a break from work which doesn't have to be spent sleeping. Instead, it's a good time to listen to music. You certainly wouldn't want to doze through this CD, as even in the familiar pieces the recorder's woody rusticity shines a new light on the old tunes. Piazzolla's Histoire du tango—a four-movement suite chronicling the evolution of tango in Argentina—expresses itself with humor, melancholy, and in the last movement, irony. Joan Albert Amargòs's Tango català has a Spanish title, but I hear Brazil in its mood, melody, and harmony. After the guitar sets the scene, the recorder joins in, substituting for a sultry singer in a work "having the quiet sadness of many a Jazz ballad" (from Leo Black's notes). Castelnuovo-Tedesco's Sonatina is the work of a classicist in love with Spain; Ravel's Pièce en forme de habanera sways to its endlessly seductive rhythm; and Entr'acte, Ibert's swirling mini-travelogue, recalls the old cliché that some of the best Spanish music is by French composers. Three works by Villa-Lobos close the recital: Modinha (literally, little song), a lyrical, syncopated melody; Distribução de flores, a haunting tune (especially when played by the tenor recorder), with an unmistakable South American Indian sound; and the Cantilena from the well-loved Bachianas
brasileiras No. 5. The recorder and guitar probably won't displace the voice and cellos of the original in listeners' affections, but the melody is as beautiful as ever... Overall, a very enjoyable disc that introduced me to some unfamiliar music while providing a fresh look at some perennials.
Fanfare Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Kremerata Baltica
Michala Petri's 50th Birthday Concert
Fanfare Magazine on Michala Petri's 50 years Birthday Concert
Fanfare Magazine
01 September 2008
Michala Petri: MICHALA PETRI—50TH BIRTHDAY CONCERT on OUR RECORDINGS       
Classical Reviews - Orchestral 
Written by Steven E. Ritter   
Saturday, 17 October 2009 


MICHALA PETRI— 50TH BIRTHDAY CONCERT • Michala Petri (rec); Daniil Grishin, cond; 1 Kremerata Baltica • OUR RECORDINGS 8.226905 (77:19) Broadcast: Copenhagen 7/2008

ALBINONI Concerto in d, op. 9/2. CHEN YI The Ancient Chinese Beauty. 1 MOZART Andante in C, K 315. ROTA Concerto for Strings. VASSILIEV To Say Goodbye. 1 VIVALDI Concerto in C, RV 443. HEIDRICH Happy Birthday Variations: Film Music; Polka/Waltz; Tango; Czardas


Michala Petri: 50th Birthday Concert
Audio CD
Our Recordings
Buy now from AmazonI cannot remember the last time a woman touted herself turning 50! But in Michala Petri's case, it only serves to show how this particular milestone means the woman is truly only getting better with age. Petri has had the solo recorder scene practically to herself her entire career, and just sampling this impressive live concert shows why. Technically, she remains the most dazzling artist of her antique instrument anywhere. The tempos in the Vivaldi are upbeat and flashy, with some dexterously handled staccato articulations. More lyrical in nature is the Albinoni Concerto, a work Petri has played infrequently. Mozart is a composer whom Petri has turned to only recently (and to grand effect), feeling that his centeredness and intimacy is something she should be exploring more thoroughly at this juncture in her life.

Chen Yi (b. 1953) is a "crossover" composer in that she attempts a mixture of Chinese and Western cultural traditions. Currently distinguished professor at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, her The Ancient Chinese Beauty has three movements: "The Clay Figurines," "The Ancient Totems," and "The Dancing Ink," which are her impressions of ancient Chinese art. It was premiered in 2008 by the Beijing Philharmonic in the city of the same name, and is a fine piece, reflecting the artistic exaggeration of forms and postures, the overwhelming yet stoic fierceness of a totem, and the dancing nature found in works of ink calligraphy.

Artem Vassiliev, now 39 years old, has written a work for alto recorder called To Say Goodbye , where the composer, in his own words, wrote the piece "as if it were a personal diary" in moments of great personal sadness after the unexpected deaths of two composer friends; for once, the music amply reflects the sentiments at the time of composition. Fitting into the middle of this concert is a wonderful Concerto for Strings by Nino Rota, revised in 1977, and among his most popular works. Rounding out the concert are the quick selections from Happy Birthday Variations by Peter Heidrich, a suitable ending to a fine evening.

Petri fans—and all others—won't be disappointed with this disc. While it can't be considered essential, it is a quality listening hour well spent, with sound that is amazingly transparent for a radio broadcast. Steven E. Ritter



Fanfare Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Kremerata Baltica
Michala Petri's 50th Birthday Concert
Review in AllMusic, America on Michala Petri´s 50 years Birthday Concet
All Music Guide
18 August 2008
Michala Petri: 50th Birthday Concert
  Send to Friend




Featured Artist

Michala Petri

Performance  Sound
 

Release Date  Time
2008 77:10

Label
OUR Recordings[8226905]

Genre

Concerto

AMG Album ID

W  185671

Corrections to this Entry?

Review by Uncle Dave Lewis 
It seems hardly possible — particularly to those fans who have followed Michala Petri since she first began to record with the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields circa 1980 — so much time has passed that Petri is celebrating her 50th birthday. There is something about Petri's choice of instrument, her bright, pristine tone and preciousness, that seems in a way eternally precocious and youthful, ever the ingénue. Nevertheless, the half century mark doesn't find Petri planning to receive AARP benefits; rather, she has organized a concert to mark the occasion and recorded it for her OUR Recordings label, which she runs with husband Lars Hannibal. Petri is appearing with a group she is especially fond of, the KREMERata BALTICA orchestra founded in 1997 by violinist Gidon Kremer. From the standard Baroque literature for recorder, Petri picks the D minor Concerto, Op. 9/2, by Tomaso Albinoni — which she recorded so winningly with Claudio Scimone and I Solisti Veneti back in 1990 — and the Vivaldi C major Concerto, RV 443, another composer to whom Petri is no stranger. Add to that a searing Mozart Andante and two freshly commissioned works, The Ancient Chinese Beauty from Chen Yi and Valere lubere (To Say Goodbye) by Kazakhstan-born Russian composer Artem Vassiliev. The latter has a tension and elegance reminiscent of Edison Denisov's Variations on Haydn's Canon "Tod ist ein Langer Schlaf." Chen's work has an especially exciting third movement, "The Dancing Ink," that snaps along with rhythmic gusto and has Petri's instrument moving through notes that one might think would have no finger holes on the recorder to accommodate them. KREMERata BALTICA gets to show off its stuff as well; they are heard in Nino Rota's Concerto for Strings and in some bits taken from Peter Heidrich's popular Happy Birthday Variations; in this last segment the extremely quiet and well-behaved audience can no longer restrain itself and joins in with enthusiastic applause and laughter. It's Michala's birthday, a good time is had by all, and so shall you.




All Music Guide

Michala Petri, recorder
Kremerata Baltica
Michala Petri's 50th Birthday Concert
German Klassik Heute on Michala Petri 50 Years Birthday Concert
Klassik Heute Magazine
18 August 2008
Details (22.06.2009)
Bestellen

 

Im Juli vergangenen Jahres (2008) feierte die dänische Blockflötenvirtuosin Michala Petri ihren fünfzigsten Geburtstag mit einem großen Festkonzert im Kopenhagener Tivoli, das live vom Dänischen Rundfunk übertragen wurde. Der Mitschnitt dieses Konzertes liegt nun als CD vor und vermittelt einen lebendigen Eindruck von der besonderen Atmosphäre des Ereignisses. Gerade diese hörbare Aura – jenseits gewöhnlicher, steriler Studio-Perfektion – macht den Reiz dieser Produktion aus und lädt den Hörer ein, die Begeisterung des Publikums „vor Ort" zu teilen.

Mitstreiter an Michala Petris Seite ist das von Gidon Kremer initiierte Ensemble Kremerata baltica, mit dem sie schon seit vielen Jahren eine glückliche Zusammenarbeit verbindet.

Das Programm ihres Geburtstagskonzertes spiegelt die musikalische Entwicklung wider, die Petri in den vergangenen Jahren gemacht hat.

Der Schritt, gemeinsam mit ihrem Mann und Duopartner Lars Hannibal ein eigenes Plattenlabel zu gründen und zukünftig nur noch Musik aufzunehmen, die ihr selbst am Herzen liegt, mag die Initialzündung für eine Wende in Petris Musikerkarriere gewesen sein und ging mit einem klaren Wandel ihres Selbstverständnisses einher: weg vom virtuosen „Wunderkind" und einem Repertoire, das stets zu beweisen suchte, welcher Virtuosität das so unscheinbare Instrument Blockflöte doch fähig ist. Nicht, dass Michala Petri an Brillanz eingebüßt hätte – seit einigen Jahren aber hat ihr Spiel an Reife gewonnen, ihr Repertoire fokussiert sich mehr und mehr auch auf die Musik unserer Zeit. Neue, beeindruckende Instrumentalkonzerte sind in Zusammenarbeit mit bedeutenden zeitgenössischen Komponisten entstanden (Börtz, Amargós, Stucky) und auf einer Grammy-nominierten CD dokumentiert (Movements. OUR Recordings 6.220531).

Auch wenn sich Petris Geburtstagsprogramm an den Eckpfeilern ihres Repertoires orientiert, so überrascht doch ihre konkrete Auswahl: zwei Konzerte des italienischen Barocks, zwei zeitgenössische Konzertstücke, Mozarts berühmtes C-Dur-Andante, Nino Rotas Concerto for Strings und als Zugabe einige Geburtstagsvariationen von Peter Heidrich. Keine platten Reißer also, sondern ein absolut stimmiger, fein abgestimmter Reigen auserlesener Musik.

Tomaso Albinonis d-Moll-Konzert op. 9 Nr. 2 eröffnet das Programm. Es entstammt der 1722 in Amsterdam veröffentlichten Sammlung von 12 Oboenkonzerten des venezianischen Meisters und steht qualitativ weit über der routinierten Massenproduktion italienischer Provenienz: Punktierte Figuren verleihen dem ersten Satz unwiderstehlichen Drive, gefolgt von einem innigen Adagio. Petri spielt das Konzert wegen des spezifischen Tonumfangs zwar auf einer Sopranblockflöte, verleiht ihm aber dennoch ein edles, samtenes Timbre. In eine exotische Klangwelt entführt Die Musikerin ihr Publikum mit den Three Ancient Chinese Beauties für Blockflöte und Streicher der bekannten chinesischen Komponistin Chen Yi. Chen Yi, seit langem in den USA lebend und lehrend, gelingt es in ihrem Petri gewidmeten Konzert, die Gefahr folkloristischer Stereotypen zu umschiffen und eine ansprechende Musik von lichter Textur zu schreiben, die den charakteristischen Charme chinesischer Melodik mit eingängiger Motorik, Glissandi und Pizzicati à la Bartók verbindet. Licht charakteristiert auch das folgende C-Dur-Andante KV 315 Mozarts. Die Ausführung mit einer Blockflöte gibt dem Stück eine ganz spezielle Note von – im positiven Sinne – fast kindlicher Reinheit. Eine Atempause für die Solistin verschafft Nino Rotas Streicherkonzert. Rota war ja durchaus nicht nur der geniale Komponist von Filmmusik für Fellini, Visconti oder Coppola, sondern hat auch eigenständige Musik für den Konzertsaal geschaffen. Sein viersätziges Konzert für Streicher knüpft harmonisch an die klassische Klarheit Mozarts an und gemahnt insbesondere im Finalsatz ein wenig an Prokofieffs Symphonie classique.

Höhepunkt des Programms ist für mich Valere iubere des jungen russischen Komponisten Artem Vassiliev, ein viertelstündiges musikalisches Epitaph, das zwischen irisierenden Klangflächen der vielfach geteilten Streicher, dramatischen Ausbrüchen, Tango-Elementen und intimen kammermusikalischen Episoden changiert. Ein Werk von meisterhafter Faktur – sowohl in der souveränen Behandlung des Streicherapparates als auch im delikaten Umgang mit dem Soloinstrument.

Einen wirklichen "Klassiker" für die Blockflöte konnte sich Michala Petri zum Schluss doch nicht verkneifen, immerhin das Konzert, das sie laut eigener Bekenntnis am häufigsten aufgeführt hat: Antonio Vivaldis C-Dur-Konzert RV 443.

Ein ganz klein wenig merkt man der Aufführung diese Routine denn auch an: die Verzierungen des zweiten Satzes wirken zwar schön ausgedacht, in der Ausführung aber keineswegs wie "in italienischer Manier" gleichsam improvisiert, sondern eher etwas brav buchstabiert. Für einen Largo-Satz gerät auch das Tempo viel zu rasch. Eine gewisse Statik vermeidende Flüssigkeit bekommt dem Satz durchaus; Petri bewegt sich aber schon sehr nah an einem Andante …

Dem begeisterten Publikum und der Jubilarin selbst konnte man eine augenzwinkernde Zugabe nicht verwehren: mit einigen Ausschnitten aus den brillanten Happy Birthday Variationen Peter Heidrichs (im Stile rührseliger Filmmusik, als Walzer, Tango und Csardas) beschloss die Kremerata baltica das Programm und ließ Michala Petri auf diesem Wege noch einmal musikalisch hochleben.

Nicht nur Blockflötenfreunde werden an dieser Zusammenstellung ihre Freude haben. Allein die beiden großartigen zeitgenössischen Werke Chens und Vassilievs lohnen den Kauf!

Heinz Braun (22.06.2009)
Künstlerische Qualität:
  9
Bewertungsskala: 1-10
Klangqualität:
  8

Gesamteindruck:
  9
 

Klassik Heute Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Kremerata Baltica
Michala Petri's 50th Birthday Concert
Review on Michala Petri's 50 Years Birthday Concert in Luxumbourg Magazine "Pizzicato""
Pizzicato Magazine
08 August 2008
- Michala Petri debütiert als Konzertsolistin Anfang 1969 im Konzertsaal des Kopenhagen Tivoli. Dorthin kehrte die dänische Blockflötistin zurück für ihr Konzert zum eigenen 50.Geburtstag. Es beginnt mit einer sonnig-beschwingten Interpretation von Albinonis d-Moll-Konzert und zeigt dann gleich, dass Michala Petri die ganze Musik beherrscht, von Barock bis zum Zeitgenössischen: sie spielt das dreisätzige Stück "Ancient Chinese beauty" von Chen Yi mit packender Intensität. Und so wechselt das Programm von gestern zu heute und zurück, wunderbar inspiriert dargeboten, meisterhaft gespielt von der Solistin, brilliant begleitet von der exzellenten Kremerata Baltika. Der Hörgenuss wird leider immer wieder durch Saalgeräusche gestört. Die Aufnahme is hallig und zielt auf Klangbrillianz.
RéF
Pizzicato Magazine

Michala Petri and Lars Hannibal
Virtuoso Baroque
Great, great 5 star Review on Virtuoso Baroque in German Magazine for Chambermusic Ensemble
Ensemble
01 August 2008

Repertoirewert: 4 stars
Klang:                4 stars
Interpretation:    5 stars (maximum)

Es war David Munrow, der nach dem Krieg die Blockflöte aus dem Kinderzimmer auf das Koncertpodium holte und das atemlose lauschende Publikum mit barock Werken in Entzücken versetzte, die man noch nicht gehört hatte – so jedenfalls erlebte ich es in den 1960er Jahren. Mit Frans Brüggen begann eine ganze Dynastie solcher Virtuosen, Michala Petri ist schon Lange einen von Ihnen. Sie erweiterte das Repertoire in vielen Richtungen, in die Moderne, gar ins Fernöstliche, macht Cross-Over-Ausflüge und spielt eigens für sie Komponiertes. Zur Feier eines 20-jährigen Duo-Jubiläums mit Lars Hannibal, ihrem Lautenpartner, kehrt sie zu ihren Wurzeln zurück, zu den grossen Barockkomponisten. Alle Werke dieser CD sind Wohlbekannt und trotzdem klingen sie ganz neu; denn die filigrane Lautenbegleitung anstelle eines Cembalos schafft einen wunderbar durchsichsichtigen Klangraum , in dem sich die Flötenstimme in allen Schattierungen entfalten kann, auch weil die Musikerin manchmal für nur einen Sonatensats ein anders mensuriertes Instrument benutzt. Bravourös nutzt sie geschickt ausgewählten Werke zur Demonstration ihrer uneingeschränkt hochvirtuosen Technik nicht nur mit der berühmten Vitali  „Chaconne" oder der Corelli „Folia", sondern auch in der spektakulären Vivaldi-Bearbeitung Chédevilles oder gar in Tartinis „Teufeltriller"- Sonate, deren Violin eskapaden sie so atemberaubend auf ihrer Blockflöte exekutiert, dass man´s  nicht glauben mag – Gratulation und Bravo!
Diether Steppuhn, January 2012

Ensemble
  OUR Recordings
Esromgade 15, opg. 1, 3rd floor, room 15
2200 Copenhagen N
Denmark
Tel: +45 4015 05 77
E-mail: hannibal@michalapetri.com
QUICK LINKS
NEWS
CONCERT SCHEDULE
BIOGRAPHY
DISCOGRAPHY
PROJECTS
COLLABORATORS
REVIEWS
GALLERIES
  AWARDS & NOMINATIONS
COMMISSIONS & PREMIERES
GUESTBOOK
CONTACT

OUR RECORDINGS WEBSITE
LARS HANNIBAL'S WEBSITE

 

 
 

Home | Contact | Copyright OUR Recordings 2002 - 2020. All rights reserved. | OUR Recordings' Official Website | Lars Hannibal's Official Website