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Lars Hannibal, guitar
Michala Petri, recorder
Blue
There is an organic quality to the music, honest, rustic, yet sophisticated in execution.
R J Lannan, Artisan Music Reviews
12 January 2021
This is my first encounter with the Hannibal/Petri family’s music and I have to say I am more than pleasantly surprised and delighted. Lars Hannibal and Michala Petri are a well-known duo with a lot of albums and collaborations. On this particular work Lars Hannibal plays guitar, Michala Petri plays recorder, Agnete Hannibal Petri plays cello and Amalie Hannibal Petri does vocals. The musical equilibrium that takes place is wonderful. The eighteen tracks on their album Blue, are Baroque influenced tunes with a mixture of Old world and New World charm. There is an organic quality to the music, honest, rustic, yet sophisticated in execution. The performances take on different forms. Sometimes it is an individual, sometimes a duo, trio, or a quartet.
The first cut is called Twilight on a Ground. Ground doesn’t have the standard English meaning we are generally familiar with. It is sort of the anchoring or base. In this case bass. Lars admits to using a simple bass line as the inspiration for the song. With a lustrous classically influenced guitar theme, it starts with some bright harmonics, a little repetition of the notes, and the recorder becomes a welcomed companion to this gentle air.
The title tune, Blue - On a Ground with guitar and recorder, uses the same concepts. This one is a bit jazzier and complex, but uses a minimalist perception of two instruments that dance around each other and never touch. The proximity is obvious as is the emotion, but the distance is noticeable as well. More about this track later.
Springtime Sun has the quartet singing and playing in the bright light of day. It is a folksy, popular tune in which Amalie voices the theme in a sweet refrain as in a spring ritual. They all celebrate the return of warmth and the greening of the earth. You can smell the flowers and the new warm breezes of the day.
Out on the Lille Vildmose in Himmerland are the Moors. These boggy hills and fens are the gathering for heaths and fairies. The Moor is a solo recorder tune that is lonely and soft. This Nordic tune has the mist of the moors, the wet grass under your feet, and the enchantment of the recorder that weaves a story of the unseen. There is a tiny hint of humming, almost subconsciously in the end that closes the tune. Careful, there be magic here.
Sunset Dance is not so much as a good bye to the day as it is a hello to the night. This twilight celebration has Michala on recorder and Lars on guitar. There are many time changes and many facets of this vignette. The sun goes down in a golden fire of color, the stars wink on, and darkness finally arrives. Let us join the dance and make merry.
The Magic of Thoughts has a melancholy refrain, but the song is anything but sad. Perhaps it is the notion of being away from the ones you love that influences the mood. Amalie’s poignant vocal is light and Agnete’s cello is barely above a whisper. The song suggests that love in your heart and thoughts in your mind will sustain you. But that only works for a while, doesn’t it?
The last eight tunes on Blue are Danish-inspired folk tunes. One of my favorites is Spurven sidder stum bag kvist (Sparrows hushed behind the bough). It features Machala’s crisp recorder notes and Lars’ unpretentious guitar accompaniment. As in the other ethnic tunes, it sounded like a church hymn with a warm melody that is comforting and evocative. I truly liked the other Danish traditional tunes as well. Although most of the songs on Blue maintain a deliciously Baroque style, there are other influences afoot. American Folk and early rock make an appearance, but all blends together well. Okay, Lars might have literally put blues in the title tune Blue. Once again, all the themes mix and combine into an album, more than an hour long, of tunes that gratify the listener on many levels. To me, Nordic-tinged music has always been cool as in temperature, but not cold at all. Just sublime to the Western ear. This is an instance where four talents create eighteen tracks that are quite pleasing and make for a satisfying listening experience. Highly recommended
R J Lannan, Artisan Music Reviews

Lars Hannibal, guitar
Michala Petri, recorder
Blue
BLUE impresses as a joy from start to finish.
Textura
03 January 2021
Having spent a half-century on stage, Danish classical guitarist Lars Hannibal has amassed a formidable list of credits. He expanded on the guitar technique he honed in ensembles during the ‘60s and ‘70s by studying lute with Toyohiko Satoh in the late ‘70s, playing jazz with trumpeter Palle Mikkelborg and bassist Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen, and forming Duo Concertante with violinist Kim Sjøgren in 1980. Not only did the latter outfit perform more than a thousand concerts, the musical partners recorded ten albums under the Duo Concertante name. Such a diverse background naturally lends itself to an equally broad approach to the music Hannibal performs, with the Danish artist drawn as much to classical and folk as popular song and modal jazz.
While his latest album does cast a wide stylistic net, it's an intimate recording that sees the guitarist joined on many of the eighteen tracks by his long-time musical companion and former wife, recorder virtuoso Michala Petri. Making BLUE even more of a family affair, three songs include their daughters, cellist Agnete and vocalist Amalie. The four's collective presence adds to the music's considerable charm, the result a recording to which one naturally warms. As appealing as the release is in total, the three songs on which all four appear (written by the guitarist in the late ‘80s) are especially endearing, in no small part due to Amalie's lovely vocal delivery.
BLUE is fundamentally a two-part presentation, with the first ten settings originals by Hannibal and the other eight from the Danish social song tradition. The title was chosen to accentuate the music's overall melancholy, its calm, free-floating quality, and introspective character. Hannibal strives for simplicity and clarity in his material, with the opening “Twilight on a Ground” serving as an excellent illustration. In using a modicum of elements—a small number of notes repeating throughout and unadorned recorder melodies—the piece distills his compositional approach into a single three-minute presentation. Even more affecting is “Evening in the Garden,” whose lilting, Spanish-tinged flow provides an elegant base for the guitarist's sensitive expressions and Michala's heartfelt voicings. In contrast to its Nordic folk tone, “BLUE on a Ground” exudes a pronounced twelve-bar blues feel, even if the recorder imbues the material with a medieval quality. In the other settings, Hannibal's uncluttered arrangements serve the material well, with the impact of a delicate piece such as “Dreams” all the stronger for the directness of its presentation.
In terms of the three quartet performances, “Autumn Rain” takes flight when Amalie's pretty, youthful voice gently glides over Hannibal's guitar arpeggios and Michala's recorder patterns. If there's a single on BLUE, it would have to be “Springtime Sun,” a samba-tinged reverie buoyed by radiant melodies and Amalie's lovely vocal. The prettiest of the three, however, is “The Magic of Thoughts,” whose lilting melodies are nothing less than swoon-inducing. The beauty of the quartet pieces suggests Hannibal might be wise to consider creating an entire album of such material.
As mentioned, the recording's second part features recorder-and-guitar arrangements of Danish songs written by famous poets and accompanied by music from leading composers of their time. Yet while Hannibal didn't write the material, the pieces complement his originals when the instrumentation is common to both. The predominating style in the second part is classical-folk balladry, with settings by Thorvald Aagaard, Thomas Laub, Carl Nielsen, Franz Gebauer, Oluf Ring, and C.E.F. Weyse featured. Like the songs in the opening section, the pieces are endearing, none more so than Nielsen's lullaby-like “Underlige Aftenlufte” (Wond'rous air of evening) and Thomas Laub's alluring “Stille, Hjerte, sol går ned” (Still, my heart, now sets the sun). Whether the pieces are vocal-enhanced or instrumental, the album's seventy-four minutes present a most flattering portrait of Hannibal as composer, arranger, and guitarist. However much its title emphasizes melancholy, BLUE impresses as a joy from start to finish.

Lars Hannibal, guitar
Michala Petri, recorder
Blue
Det er ganske enkelt et forunderligt familieforetagende! 5 Stars
Hans Christian Davidsen, Flensborg Avis
08 December 2020
 
Forunderligt familiefortagende
 
Lars Hannibal og Michala Petri har udsendt et smukt album med deres to døtre
5 Stars
 
København. Den klassiske guitarist Lars Hannibal har i eget navn udsendt et næsten meditativt album med egne kompositioner og arrangementer af stykker af bla. Carl Nielsen, Thomas Laub, Oluf Ring og C.E.F.Weyse.
Hele tre kvarter med feel good-music, som hans tidligere hustru Michala Petri bidrager til på sin fløjte. Med i flere af stykkerne er også parret døtre, der begge er midt i 20erne. Her er kommet det ypperste ud af kombinationen af arv og miljø med Agnete Hannibal Petri, cello og Amalie Hannibal Petri, der har en smuk og ren vokal. Hun brillierer på kvartetten ”Autumn Rain”.
 
Lys grundtone
Lars Hannibal voksede op i Århus, og som mange andre teenagere i 60erne begyndte han at spille guitar inspireret af Bob Dylan, The Beatles, The Kings og Rolling Stones. I slutningen af 60erne hørte han en indspilning med André Segovia, som spillede Bach´s Gavotte. Denne oplevelse blev et vendepunkt for Lars Hannibal, og han begyndte at spille klassisk guitar. Udgangspunktet er den klassiske musik, og med sangene og arrangementerne af stykker som ”Det er hvidt herude” (Laub), ”Jeg ved en lærkerede” (Carl Nielsen), og ”Sig nærmer tiden” (Ring får den en mere bred og folkelig appel. Første halvdel er forbeholdt Hannibals kompositioner, anden del indeholder arrangementer af de gamle danske sange.
Albummet har en vidunderlig lys, men også melankolsk grundtone – stille på en nordisk måde. Deraf titlen ”Blue”. Der er ingen overflødig fedt her. Hver tone og hver akkord taler sit minimalistiske sprog, og Hannibal fortæller tilbagevendende i bookletten, hvordan helt specifikke lokaliteter i den danske natur har inspireret ham til værkerne.
 
Komplekse
Albummet er mættet med harmoniske kvaliteter. Selv med simple baslinier får Lars Hannibal frembragt musik med dybde.
Hans egne kompositioner er dig også komplekse og måske ikke så let tilgængelige som de sange, vi kender, og som han og Michala Petri fortolker med den suverænitet, vi kender dem begge for.
Det er ganske enkelt et forunderligt familieforetagende. Hans Christian Davidsen, december 2020
 
Google translation.
 
Flensburg Avis
Marvelously family-business
Lars Hannibal and Michala Petri have released a beautiful album with their two daughters
5 Stars Copenhagen.
 The classical guitarist Lars Hannibal has in his own name released an almost meditative album with his own compositions and arrangements of pieces by amongst others Carl Nielsen, Thomas Laub, Oluf Ring and C.E.F.Weyse. A whole five quarters of an hour with feel good music, which his former wife Michala Petri contributes to on her flute. Included in several of the pieces are also the couple's daughters, who are both in their mid - 20s. Here the best has come out of the combination of inheritance and environment with Agnete Hannibal Petri, cello and Amalie Hannibal Petri, who has a beautiful and pure vocal. She is brilliant on the quartet "Autumn Rain".
Light basic tone
Lars Hannibal grew up in Aarhus, and like many other teenagers in the 60s, he started playing guitar inspired by Bob Dylan, The Beatles, The Kings and  Rolling Stones. In the late 60s, he heard a recording with André Segovia, who played Bach´s Gavotte. This experience became a turning point for Lars Hannibal, and he started playing classical guitar. The starting point is the classical music, and with the songs and arrangements of pieces such as "It is white out here" (Laub), "I know a lark´s nest" (Carl Nielsen), and "The time gets near" (Ring) it gets a wider and more popular approach. The first half is reserved for Hannibal's compositions, the second part contains arrangements of the old Danish songs. The album has a wonderful light, but also melancholic basic tone - quiet in a Nordic way. Hence the title "Blue". There is no excess fat here. Every note and every chord speaks its minimalist language, and Hannibal recounts in the booklet how very specific localities in Danish nature have inspired him to the works.
Complex
The album is saturated with harmonious qualities. Even with simple bass lines, Lars Hannibal produces music with depth. His own compositions are also complex to you and perhaps not as readily available as the songs we know and which he and Michala Petri interpret with the sovereignty we know them both for. It is simply a marvelous family business. Hans Christian Davidsen, December 2020
Hans Christian Davidsen, Flensborg Avis

Lars Hannibal, guitar
Michala Petri, recorder
Blue
Some contemporary music has a timeless feel to it. That's certainly true of composer-guitarist Lars Hannibal's [Blue],
Grego Applegate Edwards, classicalmodernmusic.blogspot.com
17 November 2020
Some contemporary music has a timeless feel to it. That's certainly true of composer-guitarist Lars Hannibal's [Blue], Compositions and Arrangements by Lars Hannibal (OUR Recordings 8.226914). The program contains ten short compositions by Lars and then 8 Danish songs arranged for recorder and guitar, two by Carl Nielsen plus others by lesser-known composers.
Four musical voices variously give us this music, principally Lars on classical guitar and Michala Petri on recorder, but then also three songs for guitar and recorder plus the lovely voice of Amalie Hannibal Petri and the cello of Agnete Hannibal Petri. Those songs are quite feelingful, with a sweetness that is in many ways a product of Amalie's almost Astrud Gilberto-like tenderness, and then just as much the idiomatically felicitous, the quite natural charm of the songs themselves.
The instrumental compositions and song arrangements have tonal resonance and guitar-recorder historicity that touch on almost Dowlandesque-through-to-classical-and-beyond guitar underpinnings without directly referencing so much as atmospherically paralleling such things.
The basic recorder-guitar format that occupies most of the album time excels thanks to the vibrancy of the compositions and the fine shadings of the two instrumentalists. That is true of the Hannibal pieces and then in slightly different ways of the rearranged Danish songs--by Thorvald Aagaard, Thomas Laub, Carl Nielsen, Franz Gebauer, Oluf Ring, and C.E.F. Weyse. The music covers tonal territory that gives Lars and Michala new expressive possibilities and fleshes out the program further in happy ways.
There is a real place for this CD in your listening cycle I suspect. If you want a jolt of songful tonal fare that enhances your mood with subtlety and always with high musicality, well then here we go. I could easily scarf up an entire album of the songs with Amalie P. and quartet but the three here acts as signpost showing the way through the substantial songful landscapes while they punctuate the rest of the program which is very nice indeed. Recommended. 
Grego Applegate Edwards, classicalmodernmusic.blogspot.com

Lars Hannibal, guitar
Michala Petri, recorder
Blue
Exploring Danish folk through the prism of classical music
James Roriston, Songlines
16 November 2020
Exploring Danish folk through the prism of classical music
On your first listen to this album you´ll be immediately struck by it´s “crossover” nature – the fusion of baroque music and Danish folk tunes. It will be no surprise then to learn that both Michala Petri (recorder) and Lars Hannibal (guitar) are prominent Danish classical musicians in their own right. The album is on overtly gentle affair. Soft guitar sounds, a gentle “fuzziness” in the recorder featuring occasional additions of the voice of Amelie Hannibal and cello playing Agnete Hannibal Petri. The playing and singing is sublime throughout, paticulary on the track “Waves on a Ground”, lars producing a wide variety of texture on his guitar alongside some impeccably deployed harmonics, Michala´s recorder both subtle and assured. The booklet is a worthwhile read with individual notes on each track. The initial tracks of original compositions are perhaps a little cautious musically, though there´s much to enjoy later with new arrangements of old folk classics. You might be familiar with one or two of Carl Nielsen´s tunes that have been thrown into the mix. For those yearning for boundary pushing Nordic folk with “edge” though, you are perhaps best trying your luck elsewhere.
James Roriston, Songlines

Lars Hannibal, guitar
Michala Petri, recorder
Blue
This musically delightful recording is an experience well beyond just what the ear gathers.
Zana Turner MusicWeb-International (UK)
11 November 2020
Whether listening to the music or reading the comprehensive, personal and introspective liner notes by Lars Hannibal, one instinctively concludes that this is a special recording. There is much more to music than just what the ear detects, and many of these unheard virtues are pursued in this recording.

Blue is a musical project which embraces the family of composer/guitarist Lars Hannibal: his ex-wife, the famed recorder player, Michala Petri and his daughters Agnete and Amalie. The title Blue was chosen because, for Hannibal, it reflects a specific state of mind: ‘the feeling where things flow freely and calmly in a light where both performers and listeners are equally open to let their thoughts and minds wander safely’. This same theme is re-enforced through the CD cover and liner note graphics. It even extends to the choice of instrumentation wherein only the lower-register members of the recorder family are employed. Although a classically trained musician, Lars Hannibal has a broad-based experience across several genres. During the 60s and 70s, while studying classical guitar and lute, he was very preoccupied with rock, jazz and Latin music, and wrote music for the bands in which he performed.

Hannibal has long been engaged in arranging music for the guitar, and expresses admiration for the great Catalan guitarist Miguel Llobet who made splendid arrangements of his native folk songs and piano music of his fellow countrymen. The pen of Hannibal is to be found in all of the music presented, either by way of composition or arrangement. Of the eighteen programme items the majority are for recorder and guitar; three are for quartet comprising cello, voice, guitar and recorder and the remainder are for guitar solo.
Hannibal notes: ‘my music is my personal voice, and in my music I am using my experience with different genres throughout my fifty years as a servant of music’. He also quotes the Greenlander, Orpingalik from the Netsilik people: ‘songs are thoughts that are sung-out with the breath when people are moved by great virtue, and regular speech no longer suffices’. In addition to the original three songs by Hannibal, he includes arrangements of eight folk songs highly favoured in Denmark.
The three original songs composed by Hannibal are arranged for quartet with the mellifluous voice of Amalie soaring above the instrumental accompaniment. The words of the songs are supplied in the liner notes and provide broader insight into just how deeply and emotionally Hannibal has sought to express himself, not just in music but also words. They are sung in English without trace of Danish accent, an admirable effort per se.

A good deal of technical information about the recording is supplied, also the instrumentation used. Michala Petri plays the following instruments on this recording:
Sub- Bass and Bass: Mollenhauer
Tenor: Moeck Ehlert, Mollenhauer Dream Tenor
Altos: Moeck Ehlert, Mollenhauer Modern.

One may assume that the guitar, from the hands of Kenneth Brøgger (1997), is a rather special instrument because it appears to have supplanted the beautiful guitar by Ignacio Fleta played on previous recordings by Hannibal. Kenneth Brøgger is a fellow countryman, and the leading Danish classical guitar maker of his generation. His creations are influenced by several great luthiers from the past, including Fleta.

This musically delightful recording is an experience well beyond just what the ear gathers. It is an insight into a very special musician, his feelings, perceptions and ambition to overarch all this with the participation of the most important people in his life: his family.

Zana Turner MusicWeb-International (UK)

Lars Hannibal, guitar
Michala Petri, recorder
Blue
Five stars: A lovely release in every respect
Robert Schulslaper
30 October 2020
      In American music, people don’t usually sing the blues when happy, and in the culture at large, to be “blue” is to be sad, depressed, despondent. But while guitarist/composer/arranger Lars Hannibal writes about “the expression of Blue as a mood or state of mind,” to him it’s “The feeling where things flow calmly and freely in a light where both performers and listeners are equally open to let their thoughts and minds wander safely.” As a musician, one way to facilitate this feeling is to write singable tunes supported by simple, direct harmonies. He’s followed that course throughout, and additionally, in the 8 Danish Song arranged for recorder and guitar, he’s chosen “to use only the lower instruments of the recorder family in order to keep this introvert and unflashy ‘blue mood.’” Elsewhere, smaller recorders are used as necessary to reach the higher notes, in the process adding a pleasing liveliness and timbral variety to the virtuosic embellishments.
            Stylistically, Hannibal’s compositions are an attractive amalgam of personal melodic style with influences from Baroque, Renaissance, and even Medieval models: passages recalling the great lutenists of old; grounds and descending bass lines of the sort made famous by Pachelbel’s Canon—“one of the most calm and soothing phrases that I know of in music”—and that underpin Chaconnes and Passacaglias; patterns very close to those used by J.S. Bach in several of his preludes; and occasional drones, common to both medieval music and its folksong descendants. Despite Hannibal’s professed emphasis on calm, simplicity, and clarity, the mood is not uniformly laidback: ample scope is given to movement, ornament, and virtuosity, not only in the recorder part but also evident in Hannibal’s skillful accompaniments, cleverly conceived counterpoints, and unobtrusive melodic doublings. As might be expected, he and his longtime duo partner and former wife, Michala Petri on recorder, are always in synch, and their daughters, cellist Agnete and vocalist Amalie are a credit to their musical parents. A singer/songwriter who has recorded with various bands, Amelie’s light, gracefully modulated soprano is a perfect vehicle for the two flowing, nature-inspired songs, Autumn Rain and Springtime Sun, as well as the poignant Magical Thoughts. She’s briefly overdubbed in Springtime Sun, metamorphosing from one singer into three, while for Autumn Rain, Hannibal has added a “subtle far away sound of sampled guitar…in the intro and the deep bass drum in the verse,” the latter symbolizing the earth. In The Moor, a moody recorder solo with something of the character of a lament, Michala Petri, too, “sings,” vocalizing while playing à la Roland Kirk or Jethro Tull’s Ian Anderson. One more word about the instrumental-only 8 Danish Songs: while they cohere well, the varied tunes, settings, and affects highlight each song’s individuality. Hannibal has arranged two for solo guitar, including C.E.F. Weyse’s Quiet is the night, which, in homage to Spanish guitarist/composer Francisco Tárrega, is the only piece featuring tremolo effects: listen to Tárrega’s Recuerdos de la Alhambra to truly appreciate Hannibal’s tribute. Addressing folk music’s emotional impetus, Hannibal caps his booklet snapshot of the history and tradition of Danish song with a quote from “The ancient Greenlander Orpingalik from the Netsilil people: ‘Songs are thoughts that are sung out with the breath when people are moved by great virtue and regular speech no longer suffices.”
            It’s tempting to end my review there, but I wouldn’t wish to overlook the  recording’s fine acoustical qualities, its clear and accurate attention to instrumental and vocal timbres, the warm, subtly resonant ambience, and the carefully nuanced balances. The descriptive booklet sports an evocative cover, an atmospheric landscape captured during the fabled “blue hour” beloved of photographers everywhere, that visually suggests the synergy between music and the Natural World so beautifully rendered by Lars Hannibal in this lovely release.
Robert Schulslaper

Lars Hannibal, guitar
Michala Petri, recorder
Blue
Five stars: This is beautiful, often haunting music, fabulously recorded, and fully worthy of investigation
Colin Clarke, Fanfare US
26 October 2020
Five stars: This is beautiful, often haunting music, fabulously recorded, and fully worthy of investigation
In 2017, Fanfare reviewed a disc called Garden Party that celebrated 25 years of the musical partnership of Michala Petri and Lars Hannibal as a recorder and guitar duo. Reviewed in 41:2, that disc included some compositions by Hannibal: here is a complete disc of his works and folksong arrangements. The two are linked in Hannibal’s output, though, in that he has always sought to invite dialogue between the two. To make this a family affair, the two other musicians also happen to be Petri and Hannibal’s daughters (Agnete was born in 1994, Amalia in 1996).
It would be impossible in imagine finer performances than these. Listening carefully to the simplicity of expression of the music itself reveals the art behind it. The title of the disc, [BLUE}, refers to the mood of melancholy, and indeed the gentle melancholy of Autumn Rain is a case in point as regards that concealed art. There is also a kid of concealed virtuosity in Sunset Dance, in that one only notices it retrospectively.
How beautiful, too, the vocal items Amalie Hannibal Petri’s beautiful voice perfect (the absence of vibrato enables us to experience that beauty full force). The homeliness of The Magic of Thoughts, too, with its easy flow and its invocation of an idealized world, acts as a perfect close to the first part of the disc. In contrast, the one piece for solo recorder, The Moor, (inspired by Danish Himmerland) offers a lonely call; this piece also requires the player to sing to create “interference tones” that add a curiously wistful aspect. The technical challenge here cannot be easy, but again it is delivered with consummate mastery. In Hannibal’s music, simplicity of utterance meets modal inflections meets grounds. Further exposure to this music would doubtless yield many further rewards.
The disc also offers a sequence of some eight Danish songs arranged for recorder and guitar by Hannibal; it seemed the logical way to present the fruits of both his output and the partnership of Hannibal and Petri. The music here was an integral part of Hannibal’s youth.  Lovely to have a guitar solo to balance out the recorder earlier (a very nuanced Nielsen’s I know a lark’s nest); but it is perhaps the other Nielsen song, Wond’rous air of evening) that offers the greatest sense of intimacy, a piece that happens to exude inspiration at the same time. There are some gems in here: Franz Gebauer’s Just where the way beats a bay is utterly charming.
The recording is impeccable, as is the documentation. This is beautiful, often haunting music, fully worthy of investigation.
Colin Clarke, Fanfare US

Lars Hannibal, guitar
Michala Petri, recorder
Blue
4 stjerner: I en blå stemning
Peter Dürrfeld, Kristeligt Dagblad
19 October
Kristeligt Dagblad (DK)
4 stjerner
I en blå stemning
Blue med Lars Hannibal m.fl. Our Recordings 8.226914.
Guitaristen, komponisten og produceren Lars Hannibal har sammen med Michala Petri på sit eget pladeselskab Our Recordings udgivet en cd med den korte titel ”Blue”. I noterne, der kun foreligger på engelsk, forklarer han baggrunden herfor. Titlen refererer til en sindstilstand, ”som jeg ofte tilstræber, når jeg skaber musik, en følelse, hvor tingene flyder roligt og frit i et lys, hvor både de udøvende og lytterne er åbne for at lade deres tanker gå på vandring.”
Den nye udgivelse er et familieforetagende i den forstand, at vi i en række numre ikke blot hører det kompetente musikalske makkerpar, Hannibal og Petri, men også deres to døtre, Agnete Hannibal Petri og hendes lillesøster Amalie Hannibal Petri. De er midt i 20’erne, og mens Agnete Hannibal Petri spiller cello, står Amalie Hannibal Petri for nogle sanglige udfoldelser, så det bliver en kvartet, der spiller/synger fint afstemt sammen.
Her er ikke tale om musik, der er omstyrtende eller flår og river i sjælen, men det har, som man vil forstå, heller ikke været hensigten. Tværtimod er her tale om, hvad man kunne kalde feel good-musik, endda med hele fem kvarters varighed. Desuden kan man opfatte skiven som ærkedansk eller nordisk. På en engelsksproget hjemmeside, ”The Cambridge Critique”, har pladen i hvert fald fremkaldt denne fornemmelse, for en kritiker, Anne Garvey, skriver, at ”Lars på sin guitar vil sende dig ind i det danske landskab, der var så elsket af landets mest berømte komponist”. Man kan være ret sikker på, at kritikeren fra Cambridge har haft Carl Nielsen i tankerne, selvom hun kalder ham ”Karl Neilson”. Og vist er ”Blue” i sin grundtone en meget dansk udgivelse, der givetvis vil bringe glæde i mange hjem
Peter Dürrfeld, Kristeligt Dagblad

Lars Hannibal, guitar
Michala Petri, recorder
Blue
Die ideale CD, um auf qualitätvolle Weise die immer hektischer werdende Welt sein zu lassen
Thomas Baack, Klassik Heute
08 October 2020
Künstlerische Qualität: 10  Klangqualität: 10 Gesamteindruck:10


Wenn ein Komponist für echtes „Crossover“ prädestiniert ist, so ist es der dänische Gitarrist und Lautenist Lars Hannibal. Hannibal spielte in der Jugend in Rockbands, erarbeitete sich eine fulminante Gitarrentechnik und ließ sich danach noch von Toyohiko Satoh auf der Laute unterweisen. Zeitweilig spielte er in einer Jazz-Combo mit dem berühmten Bassisten Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen. Zur Feier seines 50. Bühnenjubiläums entstand sein aktuelles Album „[BLUE]“ im Zusammenwirken mit der Blockflötenvirtuosin Michala Petri, mit der er bisher knapp 2000 Konzerte gab. Selbstverständlich durften bei einem solchen Projekt auch gemeinsamen hochmusikalischen Töchter Agnete und Amalie nicht fehlen.
Meditatives Gegenmittel zu coronarer Hektik
Hannibal greift in seinen Kompositionen auf die frühbarocken Ostinato-Formen von Passacaglia und Chaconne – in England nannte man das „Ground“, im Jazz „Blues“ – zurück und verknüpft diese mit ihnen seelenverwandten Elementen des modalen Jazz. In der Figuration der Harmonien klingen die Akkordbrechungen der Präludien der Bach-Schule an. Seine Melodik greift folkloristische, nordisch- keltische Idiome auf und würzt diese gelegentlich mit einem kräftigen Schuss südamerikanischer Salsa. Für die drei Lieder dichtete er die tiefempfundenen englischen Texte. Er lässt hier Strukturen entstehen, die ein wenig an Arvo Pärt gemahnen mögen, jedoch noch stärker auf eine fast Zen-hafte Wesentlichkeit reduziert sind. Da – und auch in den kongenialen Volksliedbearbeitungen – ist keine Note zu viel, denn ein Mehr würde die Wirkung nur schwächen.
Könner machen Hausmusik
Hannibal präsentiert seine Kompositionen auf der Gitarre mit reicher Anschlags- und Klangfarbenpalette. Geradezu kostbar sind seine fragil leuchtenden Flageoletts. Virtuosa assoluta Michala Petri demonstriert allerhöchste Spielkultur in der Gestaltung einfacher, langsamer Melodielinien. So wie es Sängern zur Ehre gereicht, Pathos und Kunstfertigkeit beim Vortrag eines einfachen Volksliedes vergessen zu machen, ist es ein Zeichen höchster bläserischer Befähigung, schlichte Tonfolgen intensiv-anrührend und nicht plakativ-demonstrierend zu gestalten. Hierfür müssen Künstler den Mut aufbringen, ihre Technik und Musikalität der Betrachtung durch ein Brennglas auszusetzen. Dies mag auf den hohen Vertretern der Blockflötenfamilie, –  mit denen man das Petri-Repertoire gemeinhin assoziiert – noch relativ einfach sein, erfordert jedoch auf den tiefen Instrumenten von Tenor bis Subbass besonders großes Können. Absolut zwingend demonstriert Petri diese Tugenden im ihr zugedachten Solostück „The Moor“. Amalie Hannibal-Petri bringt mit ihrem klaren leichten Mezzo alle Voraussetzungen für eine überzeugende Interpretation der drei im Singer-Songwriter-Stil geschriebenen vokalen Nummern mit. Man versteht den englischen Text, ohne dass sie auf simplen Sprechgesang zurückgreifen müsste. So könnte man sie sich auch im Barockrepertoire gut vorstellen. Ihre Schwester Agnete, die erst spät zum Cello fand, steuert saubere Töne zu Bass-Verstärkung bei.
Aufnahmetechnisch gab man sich Mühe, eine häusliche Atmosphäre entstehen zu lassen. Das Booklet enthält Anmerkungen des Komponisten zu jedem Stück und ausführliche Beschreibungen des Projekts. Leider – jedoch auf Grund der Informationsfülle auch verständlich – nur auf Englisch.
 
Fazit: Die ideale CD, um auf qualitätvolle Weise die immer hektischer werdende Welt sein zu lassen. Für Blockflötisten die Demonstration, wie ein wirklich dicht-gesangliches Portato klingen sollte, wie man Spezialeffekte werkdienlich gestaltet und wie man eine einfache lange Linie dynamisch mit Spannung und Tonschönheit erfüllt, was die aktuell angesagten Schnellspieler verlernt zu haben scheinen. Für die Gitarristen eine Lehrstunde bezüglich subtiler Klanglichkeit und raffinierten Timings. Unbedingte Empfehlung! 
Thomas Baack, Klassik Heute

Lars Hannibal, guitar
Michala Petri, recorder
Blue
Es ist ein meist sehr ruhiges, abendliches Programm zum Entspannen, von den vier Künstlern auf dem erwartet hohen Niveau dargeboten
Remy Franck, Pizzicato, LU
05 October 2020
Pizzicato (LU)
Der Gitarrist Lars Hannibal hat eine CD herausgebracht, auf der er in Solostücken sowie zusammen mit der Blockflötistin Michala Petri, der Cellistin Agnete Hannibal Petri und der Sängerin Amalie Hannibal Petri zu hören ist. Es sind Eigenkompositionen sowie Bearbeitungen von dänischen Liedern der Komponisten Aagaard, Laub, Nielsen, Gebauer, Ring und Weyse. Es ist ein meist sehr ruhiges, abendliches Programm zum Entspannen, von den vier Künstlern auf dem erwartet hohen Niveau dargeboten. (Our Recordings 8.226914) -♪♪♪♪. 
Remy Franck, Pizzicato, LU

Lars Hannibal, guitar
Michala Petri, recorder
Blue
It's crossover with a touch of New Age easy listening
Birmingham Evening Post & Midlands Classical Music
01 October 2020
This album of original compositions and arrangements by the Danish guitarist Lars Hannibal is a family affair. It's crossover with a touch of New Age easy listening. The majority of the pieces are for guitar and recorder, the latter played by the world-renowned Michala Petri (the former Mrs Hannibal) whose recording career has spanned more than forty years. Hannibal has an enjoyably crisp style on solo guitar tracks like Weyse's Quiet is the Night and I know a lark's nest – the latter a Carl Nielsen composition. Petri joins him in arrangements of eight Danish folk songs including Nielsen's Wond'rous air of evening. Petri's solo recorder playing on The Turk, a Hannibal composition, sounds as fresh and nimble as it did decades ago. Hannibal's quartet compositions like Autumn Rain and Springtime Sun, where he and Petri are joined by their twenty-something children Agnete (cello) and Amalie (vocals) are amiable but insubstantial
Birmingham Evening Post & Midlands Classical Music

Lars Hannibal, guitar
Michala Petri, recorder
Blue
Blue’ is brilliant.
Anne Carvey
01 October 2020
Scandinavians have the answer to everything at the moment. Liberal, relaxed they remain, even as they maintain a cool night life, fail to panic and at the very same time still fling open their doors – and their hearts - to refugees. Lars Hannibal, the composer/performer star of this album, is intimately involved in a swathe of Third World projects and international initiatives.
But what about the music? ‘Blue’ is brilliant. If you need to chill in a good way, Lars on his guitar will drift you into that Danish landscape beloved of their most famous composer Carl Nielsen, who so loved his native country and its unique countryside and culture, he felt alienated anywhere else.
“From my childhood” he wrote “I have been full of an oddly intense curiosity which has made me see something interesting in every human creature”. Lars Hannibal, a major figure in contemporary Danish music appears to have the same light, unmistakable engagement in the joyousness of his homeland.
Baltic Recording Studio have produced a very cool album indeed. ‘Blue’ has overtones of Lars Hannibal’s early influences listening and performing the work of Bob Dylan and even Joni Mitchell- the album title Blue is surely homage (copyright clearly now expired) to her greatest work.  He performs now, in true Scandinavian style,  with his ex-wife and musical partner of fifty years,  Michala  Petri and  their two daughters, Agnete Hannibal Petri cello and Amalie Hannibal Petri who has been performing since she was seven years old (she’s now 24) and has the most beautiful , voice; her compositions sung in English rely on harmonics , all the more plangent for their  simplicity. The melodies are haunting, but their plain nature belies the layers of musical experience below the presentation. And the performance world behind this album is immense. Michala alone has had more than 150 pieces composed especially for her talents, including major works by Sir Malcolm Arnold and Michael Berkeley. Her own compositions claim the title of first of the Crossover/World Music/ indie album – entitled Going to Pieces without Failing Apart (it sounds as if the characteristic cool was at cracking point here) and celebrates her world-class facility on the recorder (one to put on after a session listening to any child practising first notes on that easily-annoying instrument?). ‘The ensemble have toured the globe and are a special success in China ; their repertoire now includes some distinctly oriental sounds. In Britain, so far from habitués of folk clubs, their last performance was in the Wigmore Hall.
Amalie’s haunting voice, her mother’s lovely playing, the quiet control of father Lars’ guitar and sublime strings of Agnete create a soothing Northern antidote to the current maelström.  Many English composers have tried to evoke the beauty and chill of the Scandinavian world,  My Love Dwelt in a Northern Land by our own Edward Elgar, leaps to mind but this distinguished Danish ensemble truly conjures through wonderful instrumentation and lovely song, the spirit of Denmark, its landscape and admirable cultural attitude at its heart.
Out on Naxos this week, or see http://www.ourrecordings.com October 1th,- Anne Carvey

Lars Hannibal, guitar
Michala Petri, recorder
Blue
Det er intim musik, stille musik, undertiden ensom musik, men også familiemusik præget af sammenhold.
John Cristiansen, jc-block.dk
30 September 2020
Hvad lukketiden også blev brugt til.
 
Mange musikfolk har måttet ligge mere eller mindre brak. Mange har udnyttet tiden på en anden måde. Guitaristen Lars Hannibal har komponeret nye musikstykker og indspillet en cd, som på en lidt forunderlig og stille måde finder ind i den tid, som vi desværre ikke er kommet ud af endnu. Han har komponeret ti korte atmosfærerige stykker mestendels for guitar og dybere blokfløjter, som med deres mørkere klang fremmaler den specielle karakter, som har givet cd’en dens navn: ”Blue”.
Det er intim musik, stille musik, undertiden ensom musik, men også familiemusik præget af sammenhold. Hannibals ti sange er mestendels for Michala Petris recorder. Dette engelske ord kan oversættes til meget, men i dette tilfælde gælder det en af verdens fineste blokfløjtespilleres instrumenter. Den nye cd følger i sporet af mange mesterlige cd’er, som parret Michala Petri og Lars Hannibal har indspillet. Efter parrets skilsmisse for nogle år siden vedbliv de lykkeligvis med at musicere sammen, hvilket også gav sig udslag i et eget pladeselskab OUR. Tre af de nye kompositioner er for kvartet også bestående af de to døtre Hannibal Petri, cellisten Agnete godt på vej og sangerinden Amalie, som rammer en intim og lettere rytmisk familietone. Og det er netop en cd, som kan samle familien, også min, og det i en coronatid og sikkert også i den tid, som vi længes efter.
Den nye cds anden halvdel byder på 8 danske sange i Lars Hannibals bearbejdelse og spillet af Michala Petri og ham. Hvor er de herlige, disse kendte sange og i disse bearbejdelser. Cd’en hører med i min coronatid og skal derfor med på jc-klassisk’ efter-katalog. OUR Recordings 8.226914, distribueres af Naxos. 74 minutter. 
John Cristiansen, jc-block.dk

Lars Hannibal, guitar
Michala Petri, recorder
Blue
5 start review on Blue
Raymond Tuttle, Fanfare
15 September 2020
Recorded in June 2020, this is an appropriate CD for a pandemic because it presents a family that plays music together, with no outsiders! The parents, Michala Petri and Lars Hannibal, already are familiar to many of us. On BLUE, they introduce their musical daughters: Agnete, who plays the cello with quiet professionalism, and Amalie, who has a very likable singing voice. On three tracks, all four perform together, and nothing could be more pleasant. The first half of the CD is devoted to Hannibal’s original compositions, which are unfussy and stress-free. He writes that he often seeks to compose “blue” music—not music that is depressed or depressing, but music that is created when “things flow calmly and freely” and when there is no need to show off. Hannibal’s style as a composer reflects both his classical training and his youthful appreciation for and experiences with more popular genres. I was surprised and delighted to realize that the songwriters who first came to mind as I heard the three vocal selections were Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel. I’m not saying that these songs are as great as Bridge Over Troubled Water, for example. I’m simply saying that these songs are excellently written, and that while they seem potentially timeless in their appeal, they have a vibe that I associate with folk rock from the 1960s and 1970s.
The second half of the CD is devoted to Hannibal’s arrangements, for guitar and, in all but two, recorder, of eight classical Danish songs. These no doubt will resonate with Danish listeners more strongly than they resonate with others, but they will give pleasure to all who hear them. Again, simplicity is the key. Carl Nielsen’s Wond’rous air of evening is as straightforward and as eloquent as a Bach chorale.
The sleeve includes a thank-you “to the swallows and sparrows in the beautiful open surroundings around the studio for participating in the music making.” They add an intimate final touch to this CD.
As usual, Michala plays several different recorders on this CD, all of them with a fluency that will make even very accomplished amateurs weep with envy. In keeping with the “blue” mood of this CD, Hannibal’s arrangements call for the lower and larger instruments in the recorder family; no soprano or sopranino recorders will be heard here. Lars plays his Kenneth Brøgger guitar with even-tempered lyricism throughout, always in smooth and perfect balance with the others. BLUE, by the way, is his 50th anniversary release. What a wonderful way to celebrate.
Calming, quietly cheerful, and flawlessly executed, BLUE is just what we need to get us through challenging times. Sometimes simple is best.
Raymond Tuttle, Fanfare

Michala Petri, recorder
Mahan Esfahani, harpsichord
BACH
6 Sonatas for recorder
Unbedingte Kaufempfehlung!
Thomas Baack, Windkanal
01 May 2020
Windkanal
 
Petri mit Bach-Sonaten
 
 
Wer die 6 Sonaten von J. S. Bach auf einer Blockfl öte in barocker Mensur spielen möchte, muss sich aufgrund von deren ungewöhnlicher Extension in die dreigestrichene Oktave diversen Unbequemlichkeiten aussetzen.Andere Stellen verlangen wiederum eine klangvolle Tiefe, sodass selbst exzellente Barock-Kopien hier an ihre Grenzen stoßen. Michala Petri, die »Primadonna ohne Allüre der Blockflöte« lost dieses Problem radikal, indem sie vorwiegend auf Harmonische Blockfl öten (Moeck-Ehlert, Mollenhauer Moderne Alt) setzt und zwecks klanglicher Differenzierung auf ihre 70er-Jahre Moeck-RottenburghModelle zurückgreift. Dies bedingt, dass – da diese Instrumente nur in moderner Stimmung (442 Hz) zur Verfügung stehen – Cembalo
und die in dieser Aufnahme hinzugefügte Gambe einen Halbton höher als gewohnt musizieren müssen. Prüfsteine des Bach-Sonatenspiels sind die beiden düsteren Werke in h-Moll und e-Moll. Petri, die sich Dank des bis e1 erweiterten Tonumfangs der Mollenhauer-Instrumente in BWV 1030 für die Originaltonart und nicht für die grifftechnisch einfachere Halbtontransposition nach c-Moll entschied, und ihre Kollegen verzichten darauf, das Andante, dessen Anfangsduktus an die Bass-Arie »Erleucht‘ auch meine finstre Sinnen« aus dem Weihnachtsoratorium erinnert, mit einem passionsartigen Trauerfl or zu versehen. Sie
stellen vielmehr die gezackten 32stel-Motive, die sich in den anschließenden – von Petri wundervoll schlackenlos im Legato phrasierten – 16tel-Triolen nie ganz entspannen können, als Moment der Aggression klar heraus, sodass sich ein Bogen zu den trotzigen Synkopen des Gigue-Abschnitts im Presto- Finale ergibt. Ähnliches geschieht im Adagio ma non troppo der Sonate e-Moll (hier nach g-Moll inklusive des b3 als »Crí du coeur« transponiert), wo die Zweierbindungen der 16tel nicht geschmackvoll angeseufzt, sondern als existenzielles Stöhnen wahrnehmbar werden. Ursprünglich hat mich der improvisatorische Einstieg in
den chaconneartigen Bass des Andantes irritiert. Als Antwort im Gestus eines »sich erst einmal selbst wieder finden Müssens« auf das im vorangegangen Allegro entfachte Feuerwerk überzeugt es mich nach wiederholtem Anhören durchaus, wenngleich dieser Effekt der Ratlosigkeit »live« noch stärker wirken dürfte. Diskussionen dürfte die Verwendung der Gambe in den Sonaten mit obligatem Cembalo entfachen. Hier befinden wir uns in einem Grauzonenbereich. Die h-Moll-Sonate würde sich vom Charakter her durchaus als Bereicherung der sechs Sonaten »a 2 Clav. et Ped.« für Orgel anbieten. Ebenso wäre ein Arrangement als Trio für Flöte, Violine, Continuo denkbar. Somit stört die sehr differenziert eingesetzte Gambe Hille Perls den Gesamteindruck weniger als der etwas farblose Klang des Cembalos in der Lage zwischen c1 und c3. Vergleicht man die neue Einspielung mit der 1992 eingespielten Version mit Keith Jarrett, muss das Urteil lauten: Für die damaligen Verhältnisse durchaus eine Sensation, im Vergleich zur Neueinspielung technisch damals schon von einer unglaublichen Könnerschaft befl ügelt, interpretatorisch jedoch viel zu brav – ein Umstand, der mir manche frühe Petri-Interpretation verleidet.Um den Reifungsprozess Michala Petris nachvollziehen zu können, reicht einzig der Vergleich von BWV 1034/1.
 
Fazit: Michala Petri, Mahan Esfahani und Hille Perl verweisen mit ihrem tiefen Eindringen in die Bach-Sonaten und ihre stupende Umsetzung des Erkannten sämtliche Aufnahmen mit Block- und modernen Querflöten auf die hinteren Plätze. Einzig Barthold Kuijken auf dem Traverso erreicht dieses Niveau annähernd. Faszinierend, wie sich Petris in flötistischer Sicht immer über alle Zweifel erhabene Interpretation zum Essentiellen gewandelt hat. Unbedingte Kaufempfehlung! Thomas Baack
Michala Petri, Hille Perl, Mahan Esfahani: Bach – 6 Flute Sonatas BWV 1030–1035. OUR Recordings,
6.220673 (2019).
Thomas Baack, Windkanal

Michala Petri, recorder
Mahan Esfahani, harpsichord
BACH
6 Sonatas for recorder
Each is performed with the utmost sincerity and seriousness of approach
David Threasher, Gramophone
04 February 2020
Mahan Esfahani is characteristically pugnacious in his defence of these six works, in terms of their quality and authenticity, and even the choice of instruments on which he and his colleagues choose to perform them. The quality of any piece of music – especially if the product of one of the great geniuses of the canon – is non-negotiable; but the truth is that none of its numerical successors matches the B minor Sonata, BWV1030, in terms of scale, ambition or emotional reach.
Each is, though, performed with the utmost sincerity and seriousness of approach. While the tonal and expressive range of the recorder, viol and harpsichord may appear constrained in comparison to, say, flute, cello and piano, in the hands of foremost players such as these, even a relatively lightweight work such as the C major Sonata, BWV1033, comes over as the ideal demonstration of a particular facet of the composer’s style and the performers’ abilities.
Michala Petri uses a range of recorders, preferring Moeck Ehlert instruments for slow movements and Moeck Rottenburgh (tenor) or Mollenhauer (alto) for faster music. Esfahani’s harpsichord is a modern construction inspired by a Berlin instrument from 1710. Hille Perl plays a Matthias Alban gamba from 1686. Ornamentation is liberal but always tasteful, and balanced by an innate feeling for when to play the music just as plainly as it appears on the page. Esfahani’s exploratory approach to accompaniment and continuo realisation, and judicious deployment of the registrational variations available, keeps the textures buoyant. The generously reverberant acoustic of the Garnisons Kirke in Copenhagen presents the instruments in a realistic balance, with the harpsichord perhaps dominating only slightly. Sample, though, the range of colours these players evoke in their deliciously imaginative presentation of the ground-bass Andante of the G minor Sonata, BWV1034.
David Threasher, Gramophone

Michala Petri, recorder
Mahan Esfahani, harpsichord
BACH
6 Sonatas for recorder
Petri og venner
Nikolaj Skinhøj, Klassisk
16 January 2020
Nikolaj Skinhøj, Klassisk

Michala Petri, recorder
Mahan Esfahani, harpsichord
BACH
6 Sonatas for recorder
in performances of such engaging quality that I shall certainly be listening to the CD again and again.
Hugill, Planet Hugill Blogg
15 January 2020

Not all of Bach's works come down to us in their original versions, and scholars sometimes postulate an 'original' instrumentation from a later incarnation. For example for Bach's Sonata in B minor, BWV 1030 for transverse flute there are indications (another harpsichord part in another key) that the work originated on different instruments. The suggestion with this work is that Bach transcribed it from something earlier for his Collegium Musicum in Leipzig.

So, on this disc we have the distinguished recorder player
Michala Petri, joined by viola da gambaa player Hille Perl and harpsichordist Mahan Esfahani for Bach's six flute sonatas in versions transcribed for recorder. Petri plays two different recorders, alto and tenor, and the sonatas are generally played transposed. But what really counts here is the sheer quality of the music making. Petri plays with wonderfully rounded, speaking tones and completely convinces in the sonatas' new incarnations. The sheer expressivity of her playing is outstanding, and she helped by the superb partnership she receives from Esfahani and Perl. This is very much ensemble music making, not the sort where the solo instrument is placed top dead centre with the others relegated to the rear. I was particularly struck by the sheer vibrancy and vividness of Esfahani's harpsichord, so that all three instruments make apt complements.

Unlike the solo violin music, these pieces were not written as a set and that makes the sheer variety and quality of the material so remarkable. This is music that I did not know very well, in performances of such engaging quality that I shall certainly be listening to the CD again and again
Hugill, Planet Hugill Blogg

DVD: MARIN (Animated Fantasy), Axel (Portrait)
SACD: Selected Highlights
Marin
Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012)
Verstörend schön - 5 stars Überragend
Miguel Cabruja Klassik.com
13 January 2020
Das dänische Label OUR Recordings hat Axel Borup-Jørgensen eine Box gewidmet.
Axel Borup-Jørgensens (1924–2012) Orchesterwerk 'Marin' beginnt leise grollend wie aus weiter Ferne. Dann aber verdichtet 'Marin' sich, spitzt sich zu, schwillt an und zieht den Zuhörer in einen Strudel heranrollender, sich überschlagender Klangwellen, um dann wieder abzuebben und zu verklingen. Die 1970 von Herbert Blomstedt uraufgeführte, riesenhafte Komposition mit 55 notierten Streicherstimmen zeichnet kein lieblich-maritimes Naturbild. Sie ergeht sich auch nicht in Klischees – weder in denen der musikalischen Moderne noch in denen einer wie auch immer gearteten Nachromantik. 'Marin' ist wohl das bedeutendste Orchesterwerk Borup-Jørgensens. Als solches steht es im Zentrum der Doppel-Box, die das dänische Label OUR Recordings dem in Hjørring geborenen und in Schweden aufgewachsenen Komponisten gewidmet hat.
Repräsentativer Querschnitt
Hervorragend durch das DR SymfoniOrkestret (Leitung: Thomas Søndergård) interpretiert, eröffnet 'Marin' die in brillantem Raumklang eingespielte SACD der Doppel-Box. Die folgenden Kompositionen für Ensembles und Soloinstrumente ergeben einen repräsentativen Querschnitt durch Borup-Jørgensens Werk. Zu hören sind 'music for percussion + viola', 'Für Cembalo und Orgel', 'Nachtstück', 'winter pieces', 'Pergolato' und 'Coast of Sirens'. Sie alle zeigen einen Komponisten, der in den 1950er Jahren die Darmstädter Ferienkurse besuchte, sich aber nicht seriellen Tendenzen oder elektroakustischen Experimenten zuwandte, sondern stattdessen seine Inspirationen in der schwedischen Natur und Poesie fand. Das wird vor allem auch in der Komposition 'Coast of Sirens' deutlich, die sich mit dem Odysseus-Mythos auseinandersetzt. Das exzellent von der Århus Sinfonietta (Leitung: Søren Kinch Hansen) interpretierte Stück für Flöte, Klarinette, Violine, Cello, Gitarre, Klavier, Perkussion und Multivoice Tape scheint wie aus archaischer Vergangenheit herüberzuwehen und ist in seiner unromantischen Naturhaftigkeit faszinierend düster und verstörend schön zugleich.
Geheimnisvolle Unterwasserwelt
Den Tonträger ergänzt die Box durch eine DVD, die unter dem schlichten Titel 'Axel' (Produktion: Allan O Lückow und Lars Hannibal) ein Portrait des Komponisten enthält. Zeitgenossen, Weggefährten, Kollegen sowie die Tochter Borup-Jørgensens tragen zu der Dokumentation bei. Auf der DVD ist außerdem ein computeranimierter Film (Regie: Morten Bartholdy) zu sehen, der 'Marin' in bewegte Bilder übersetzt: Zu den Klängen der auch auf der SACD enthaltenen Einspielung führt die Animation in eine geheimnisvolle Unterwasserwelt, in der sich mythologisch wirkende Wesen durch surreale Stadträume und Bauten bewegen. Auch wenn das visuelle Konzept auf Zeichnungen Borup-Jørgensens basiert, ist der Film ausdrücklich kein Versuch, seine Musik zu bebildern oder zu erläutern. Für manche mag er eine Hilfe sein, sich auf 'Marin' einzulassen. Andere werden sich lieber mit der Musik allein auseinandersetzen wollen. Beides lohnt sich in jedem Fall. 13.01.2020 Miguel Cabruja  

Miguel Cabruja Klassik.com
  OUR Recordings
Esromgade 15, opg. 1, 3rd floor, room 15
2200 Copenhagen N
Denmark
Tel: +45 4015 05 77
E-mail: hannibal@michalapetri.com
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